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Current practice patterns in the treatment of Charcot foot.
Foot Ankle Int. 2000 Nov; 21(11):916-20.FA

Abstract

Treatment of Charcot foot osteoarthropathy has emerged as a major component of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Diabetes 2000 Initiative. A two-part survey described treatment patterns and current footwear use of patients with Charcot osteoarthropathy of the foot and ankle. In the first part, 94 consecutive patients with a history of Charcot foot and ankle presenting for care were questioned on their foot-specific treatment and current footwear use. A history of diabetic foot ulcer was given by 39 (41%) patients, and an infection had been present in a foot of 20 (21%) patients. The initial treatment of the Charcot foot and ankle had been a total contact cast in 46 (49%) patients, and a pre-fabricated walking boot in 19 (20%). Charcot related surgery had consisted of 76 procedures in 46 (49%) patients. Sixty-three (67%) patients were currently using accommodative footwear (depth-inlay shoes in 46 [49%], custom shoes in 10 [11%], and CROW in 7 [7%] patients), and 72 (77%) were currently using custom accommodative foot orthoses. The second part of this study consisted of a questionnaire completed by 37 orthopaedic surgeons (members of AOFAS) interested in forming a Charcot Study Group. They treated an average of 11.8 patients having Charcot foot or ankle per month. Thirty (81%) used the Semmes-Weinstein 5.07 monofilament as a screening tool for peripheral neuropathy. For treatment of Eichenholtz Stage I, 29 (78%) used a total contact cast and 15 (41%) allowed weightbearing; for Stage II, 30 (81%) physicians used a total contact cast and 18 (49%) allowed weightbearing. Although the literature contains uniform recommendations for immobilization and non-weightbearing as treatment for the initial phases of Charcot arthropathy, the results of this benchmarking study reveal that currenl treatment is varied.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery & Rehabilitation, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL 60153, USA. mpinzu1@luc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11103763

Citation

Pinzur, M S., et al. "Current Practice Patterns in the Treatment of Charcot Foot." Foot & Ankle International, vol. 21, no. 11, 2000, pp. 916-20.
Pinzur MS, Shields N, Trepman E, et al. Current practice patterns in the treatment of Charcot foot. Foot Ankle Int. 2000;21(11):916-20.
Pinzur, M. S., Shields, N., Trepman, E., Dawson, P., & Evans, A. (2000). Current practice patterns in the treatment of Charcot foot. Foot & Ankle International, 21(11), 916-20.
Pinzur MS, et al. Current Practice Patterns in the Treatment of Charcot Foot. Foot Ankle Int. 2000;21(11):916-20. PubMed PMID: 11103763.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Current practice patterns in the treatment of Charcot foot. AU - Pinzur,M S, AU - Shields,N, AU - Trepman,E, AU - Dawson,P, AU - Evans,A, PY - 2000/12/5/pubmed PY - 2001/6/2/medline PY - 2000/12/5/entrez SP - 916 EP - 20 JF - Foot & ankle international JO - Foot Ankle Int VL - 21 IS - 11 N2 - Treatment of Charcot foot osteoarthropathy has emerged as a major component of the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society (AOFAS) Diabetes 2000 Initiative. A two-part survey described treatment patterns and current footwear use of patients with Charcot osteoarthropathy of the foot and ankle. In the first part, 94 consecutive patients with a history of Charcot foot and ankle presenting for care were questioned on their foot-specific treatment and current footwear use. A history of diabetic foot ulcer was given by 39 (41%) patients, and an infection had been present in a foot of 20 (21%) patients. The initial treatment of the Charcot foot and ankle had been a total contact cast in 46 (49%) patients, and a pre-fabricated walking boot in 19 (20%). Charcot related surgery had consisted of 76 procedures in 46 (49%) patients. Sixty-three (67%) patients were currently using accommodative footwear (depth-inlay shoes in 46 [49%], custom shoes in 10 [11%], and CROW in 7 [7%] patients), and 72 (77%) were currently using custom accommodative foot orthoses. The second part of this study consisted of a questionnaire completed by 37 orthopaedic surgeons (members of AOFAS) interested in forming a Charcot Study Group. They treated an average of 11.8 patients having Charcot foot or ankle per month. Thirty (81%) used the Semmes-Weinstein 5.07 monofilament as a screening tool for peripheral neuropathy. For treatment of Eichenholtz Stage I, 29 (78%) used a total contact cast and 15 (41%) allowed weightbearing; for Stage II, 30 (81%) physicians used a total contact cast and 18 (49%) allowed weightbearing. Although the literature contains uniform recommendations for immobilization and non-weightbearing as treatment for the initial phases of Charcot arthropathy, the results of this benchmarking study reveal that currenl treatment is varied. SN - 1071-1007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11103763/Current_practice_patterns_in_the_treatment_of_Charcot_foot_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/107110070002101105?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -