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Does dietary protein intake correlate with markers suggestive of early diabetic nephropathy in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus?
Diabet Med. 2000 Oct; 17(10):708-12.DM

Abstract

AIMS

To examine the relationship between dietary protein intake and possible early markers of diabetic nephropathy (creatinine clearance (CrCI), kidney volume and albumin excretion rate (AER)).

METHODS

One hundred and forty-five subjects with diabetes for 5-10 years, divided into three pubertal groups, participated. Kidney volume was measured by ultrasound, and serum creatinine and HbA1c were assayed. Two or three 24-h urine collections were obtained for albumin, creatinine and urea excretion rates. Dietary protein intake was estimated from urinary urea nitrogen excretion rate. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated by creatinine clearance.

RESULTS

Mean protein intake was 1.22 +/- 0.48 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) Protein intake was significantly higher in males than females (P < 0.0001) and highest in prepubertal compared to mid-pubertal and post-pubertal subjects (P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, protein intake was positively associated with CrCl (P < 0.0001), and male sex (P < 0.0001) and negatively associated with body surface area (P = 0.0013) and age (P = 0.01). Kidney volume and AER were not related to dietary protein intake.

CONCLUSIONS

This cross-sectional study failed to show a significant relationship between dietary protein intake and markers of early nephropathy, other than CrCl. However, a longitudinal, prospective study is required to definitively assess the role of protein intake in the evolution of diabetic nephropathy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11110503

Citation

O'Hayon, B E., et al. "Does Dietary Protein Intake Correlate With Markers Suggestive of Early Diabetic Nephropathy in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus?" Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, vol. 17, no. 10, 2000, pp. 708-12.
O'Hayon BE, Cummings EA, Daneman D, et al. Does dietary protein intake correlate with markers suggestive of early diabetic nephropathy in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus? Diabet Med. 2000;17(10):708-12.
O'Hayon, B. E., Cummings, E. A., Daneman, D., Ossip, M. G., Lawson, M. L., & Sochett, E. B. (2000). Does dietary protein intake correlate with markers suggestive of early diabetic nephropathy in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus? Diabetic Medicine : a Journal of the British Diabetic Association, 17(10), 708-12.
O'Hayon BE, et al. Does Dietary Protein Intake Correlate With Markers Suggestive of Early Diabetic Nephropathy in Children and Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus. Diabet Med. 2000;17(10):708-12. PubMed PMID: 11110503.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Does dietary protein intake correlate with markers suggestive of early diabetic nephropathy in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus? AU - O'Hayon,B E, AU - Cummings,E A, AU - Daneman,D, AU - Ossip,M G, AU - Lawson,M L, AU - Sochett,E B, PY - 2000/12/8/pubmed PY - 2001/3/27/medline PY - 2000/12/8/entrez SP - 708 EP - 12 JF - Diabetic medicine : a journal of the British Diabetic Association JO - Diabet Med VL - 17 IS - 10 N2 - AIMS: To examine the relationship between dietary protein intake and possible early markers of diabetic nephropathy (creatinine clearance (CrCI), kidney volume and albumin excretion rate (AER)). METHODS: One hundred and forty-five subjects with diabetes for 5-10 years, divided into three pubertal groups, participated. Kidney volume was measured by ultrasound, and serum creatinine and HbA1c were assayed. Two or three 24-h urine collections were obtained for albumin, creatinine and urea excretion rates. Dietary protein intake was estimated from urinary urea nitrogen excretion rate. Glomerular filtration rate was estimated by creatinine clearance. RESULTS: Mean protein intake was 1.22 +/- 0.48 g x kg(-1) x day(-1) Protein intake was significantly higher in males than females (P < 0.0001) and highest in prepubertal compared to mid-pubertal and post-pubertal subjects (P < 0.001). In multiple regression analysis, protein intake was positively associated with CrCl (P < 0.0001), and male sex (P < 0.0001) and negatively associated with body surface area (P = 0.0013) and age (P = 0.01). Kidney volume and AER were not related to dietary protein intake. CONCLUSIONS: This cross-sectional study failed to show a significant relationship between dietary protein intake and markers of early nephropathy, other than CrCl. However, a longitudinal, prospective study is required to definitively assess the role of protein intake in the evolution of diabetic nephropathy. SN - 0742-3071 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11110503/Does_dietary_protein_intake_correlate_with_markers_suggestive_of_early_diabetic_nephropathy_in_children_and_adolescents_with_Type_1_diabetes_mellitus DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -