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Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis.
Proc Nutr Soc 2000; 59(4):531-5PN

Abstract

Inheriting genetic risk factors for multiple sclerosis (MS) is not sufficient to cause this demyelinating disease of the central nervous system; exposure to environmental risk factors is also required. MS may be preventable if these unidentified environmental factors can be avoided. MS prevalence increases with decreasing solar radiation, suggesting that sunlight may be protective in MS. Since the vitamin D endocrine system is exquisitely responsive to sunlight, and MS prevalence is highest where environmental supplies of vitamin D are lowest, we have proposed that the hormone, 1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2D3), may protect genetically-susceptible individuals from developing MS. Evidence consistent with this hypothesis comes not only from geographic studies, but also genetic and biological studies. Over-representation of the vitamin D receptor gene b allele was found in Japanese MS patients, suggesting it may confer MS susceptibility. Fish oil is an excellent vitamin D source, and diets rich in fish may lower MS prevalence or severity. Vitamin D deficiency afflicts most MS patients, as demonstrated by their low bone mass and high fracture rates. However, the clearest evidence that vitamin D may be a natural inhibitor of MS comes from experiments with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. Treatment of mice with 1,25-(OH)2D3 completely inhibited EAE induction and progression. The hormone stimulated the synthesis of two anti-encephalitogenic cytokines, interleukin 4 and transforming growth factor beta-1, and influenced inflammatory cell trafficking or apoptosis. If vitamin D is a natural inhibitor of MS, providing supplemental vitamin D to individuals who are at risk for MS would be advisable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 433 Babcock Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. hayes@biochem.wisc.edu

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11115787

Citation

Hayes, C E.. "Vitamin D: a Natural Inhibitor of Multiple Sclerosis." The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, vol. 59, no. 4, 2000, pp. 531-5.
Hayes CE. Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis. Proc Nutr Soc. 2000;59(4):531-5.
Hayes, C. E. (2000). Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis. The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society, 59(4), pp. 531-5.
Hayes CE. Vitamin D: a Natural Inhibitor of Multiple Sclerosis. Proc Nutr Soc. 2000;59(4):531-5. PubMed PMID: 11115787.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin D: a natural inhibitor of multiple sclerosis. A1 - Hayes,C E, PY - 2000/1/11/pubmed PY - 2001/10/5/medline PY - 2000/1/11/entrez SP - 531 EP - 5 JF - The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society JO - Proc Nutr Soc VL - 59 IS - 4 N2 - Inheriting genetic risk factors for multiple sclerosis (MS) is not sufficient to cause this demyelinating disease of the central nervous system; exposure to environmental risk factors is also required. MS may be preventable if these unidentified environmental factors can be avoided. MS prevalence increases with decreasing solar radiation, suggesting that sunlight may be protective in MS. Since the vitamin D endocrine system is exquisitely responsive to sunlight, and MS prevalence is highest where environmental supplies of vitamin D are lowest, we have proposed that the hormone, 1, 25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2D3), may protect genetically-susceptible individuals from developing MS. Evidence consistent with this hypothesis comes not only from geographic studies, but also genetic and biological studies. Over-representation of the vitamin D receptor gene b allele was found in Japanese MS patients, suggesting it may confer MS susceptibility. Fish oil is an excellent vitamin D source, and diets rich in fish may lower MS prevalence or severity. Vitamin D deficiency afflicts most MS patients, as demonstrated by their low bone mass and high fracture rates. However, the clearest evidence that vitamin D may be a natural inhibitor of MS comes from experiments with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of MS. Treatment of mice with 1,25-(OH)2D3 completely inhibited EAE induction and progression. The hormone stimulated the synthesis of two anti-encephalitogenic cytokines, interleukin 4 and transforming growth factor beta-1, and influenced inflammatory cell trafficking or apoptosis. If vitamin D is a natural inhibitor of MS, providing supplemental vitamin D to individuals who are at risk for MS would be advisable. SN - 0029-6651 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11115787/Vitamin_D:_a_natural_inhibitor_of_multiple_sclerosis_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0029665100000768/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -