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Blood homocysteine and vitamin B levels are not associated with cognitive skills in healthy normally ageing subjects.
J Nutr Health Aging 2000; 4(4):218-22JN

Abstract

Increased plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels are a known risk factor for vascular disease and have been reported in association with cognitive impairment of old age. Alternatively, however, increased tHcy levels may simply be an indicator of B vitamin deficiency. We evaluated the relationship between plasma tHcy levels, serum vitamin B12 and folate levels, and the scores at a battery of neuropsychological tests in 54 healthy cognitively normal subjects aged 65 years and over. Hyperhomocysteinemia prevalence (plasma tHcy>15 micromol/L) was about 24%. In univariate analysis, vitamin B12 levels were associated with both verbal memory and visuo-spatial skills, whereas no association was found between psychometric test scores and folate levels or tHcy levels. However, none of the univariate associations of neuropsychological test scores and serum B12 vitamin levels was confirmed when adjusting for age, education and other confounding variables. In conclusion, although a relationship between homocysteine, B vitamins and poor cognitive skills in the elderly is plausible, this study does not suggests that such relationship is biologically important.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for the Study of Fisiopathology of Ageing, University of Bologna, Italy. ravaglia@almadns.unibo.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11115804

Citation

Ravaglia, G, et al. "Blood Homocysteine and Vitamin B Levels Are Not Associated With Cognitive Skills in Healthy Normally Ageing Subjects." The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, vol. 4, no. 4, 2000, pp. 218-22.
Ravaglia G, Forti P, Maioli F, et al. Blood homocysteine and vitamin B levels are not associated with cognitive skills in healthy normally ageing subjects. J Nutr Health Aging. 2000;4(4):218-22.
Ravaglia, G., Forti, P., Maioli, F., Zanardi, V., Dalmonte, E., Grossi, G., ... Caldarera, M. (2000). Blood homocysteine and vitamin B levels are not associated with cognitive skills in healthy normally ageing subjects. The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, 4(4), pp. 218-22.
Ravaglia G, et al. Blood Homocysteine and Vitamin B Levels Are Not Associated With Cognitive Skills in Healthy Normally Ageing Subjects. J Nutr Health Aging. 2000;4(4):218-22. PubMed PMID: 11115804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blood homocysteine and vitamin B levels are not associated with cognitive skills in healthy normally ageing subjects. AU - Ravaglia,G, AU - Forti,P, AU - Maioli,F, AU - Zanardi,V, AU - Dalmonte,E, AU - Grossi,G, AU - Cucinotta,D, AU - Macini,P, AU - Caldarera,M, PY - 2000/12/15/pubmed PY - 2001/6/29/medline PY - 2000/12/15/entrez SP - 218 EP - 22 JF - The journal of nutrition, health & aging JO - J Nutr Health Aging VL - 4 IS - 4 N2 - Increased plasma total homocysteine (tHcy) levels are a known risk factor for vascular disease and have been reported in association with cognitive impairment of old age. Alternatively, however, increased tHcy levels may simply be an indicator of B vitamin deficiency. We evaluated the relationship between plasma tHcy levels, serum vitamin B12 and folate levels, and the scores at a battery of neuropsychological tests in 54 healthy cognitively normal subjects aged 65 years and over. Hyperhomocysteinemia prevalence (plasma tHcy>15 micromol/L) was about 24%. In univariate analysis, vitamin B12 levels were associated with both verbal memory and visuo-spatial skills, whereas no association was found between psychometric test scores and folate levels or tHcy levels. However, none of the univariate associations of neuropsychological test scores and serum B12 vitamin levels was confirmed when adjusting for age, education and other confounding variables. In conclusion, although a relationship between homocysteine, B vitamins and poor cognitive skills in the elderly is plausible, this study does not suggests that such relationship is biologically important. SN - 1279-7707 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11115804/Blood_homocysteine_and_vitamin_B_levels_are_not_associated_with_cognitive_skills_in_healthy_normally_ageing_subjects_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/dementia.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -