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Absorption of iron from unmodified maize and genetically altered, low-phytate maize fortified with ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Jan; 73(1):80-5.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Reducing the phytate content in grains by genetic manipulation is a novel approach to increasing nonheme-iron absorption from mixed diets. Fractional iron absorption from a genetically modified strain of low-phytate maize (LPM) increased significantly, by 50%.

OBJECTIVE

We assessed iron absorption from porridges prepared from the same LPM (lpa-1-1 mutant) and unmodified wild-type maize (WTM), both of which were fortified with either ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA.

DESIGN

Porridges providing 3.4 mg Fe were fortified with either ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA to provide an additional 1 mg Fe/serving. In 14 nonanemic women, iron absorption was measured as the amount of radioiron incorporated into red blood cells (extrinsic tag method) 12 d after consumption of the study diets.

RESULTS

No significant effect of phytate content on iron absorption was found when porridge was fortified with either sodium iron EDTA or ferrous sulfate. Fractional absorption of iron from WTM porridge fortified with sodium iron EDTA (5.73%) was 3.39 times greater than that from the same porridge fortified with ferrous sulfate (1.69%). Fractional absorption of iron from the sodium iron EDTA-fortified LPM porridge (5.40%) was 2.82 times greater than that from LPM porridge fortified with ferrous sulfate (1.91%) (P<0.0001 for both comparisons, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Thus, the previously identified benefit of LPM was no longer detectable when maize porridge was fortified with additional iron.

CONCLUSION

Iron was absorbed more efficiently when the fortificant was sodium iron EDTA rather than ferrous sulfate, regardless of the type of maize.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Nutrition of Central America and Panama, Guatemala City, Guatemala. cmendoza@ucdavis.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11124754

Citation

Mendoza, C, et al. "Absorption of Iron From Unmodified Maize and Genetically Altered, Low-phytate Maize Fortified With Ferrous Sulfate or Sodium Iron EDTA." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 73, no. 1, 2001, pp. 80-5.
Mendoza C, Viteri FE, Lönnerdal B, et al. Absorption of iron from unmodified maize and genetically altered, low-phytate maize fortified with ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73(1):80-5.
Mendoza, C., Viteri, F. E., Lönnerdal, B., Raboy, V., Young, K. A., & Brown, K. H. (2001). Absorption of iron from unmodified maize and genetically altered, low-phytate maize fortified with ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 73(1), 80-5.
Mendoza C, et al. Absorption of Iron From Unmodified Maize and Genetically Altered, Low-phytate Maize Fortified With Ferrous Sulfate or Sodium Iron EDTA. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73(1):80-5. PubMed PMID: 11124754.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Absorption of iron from unmodified maize and genetically altered, low-phytate maize fortified with ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA. AU - Mendoza,C, AU - Viteri,F E, AU - Lönnerdal,B, AU - Raboy,V, AU - Young,K A, AU - Brown,K H, PY - 2000/12/22/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/12/22/entrez SP - 80 EP - 5 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 73 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Reducing the phytate content in grains by genetic manipulation is a novel approach to increasing nonheme-iron absorption from mixed diets. Fractional iron absorption from a genetically modified strain of low-phytate maize (LPM) increased significantly, by 50%. OBJECTIVE: We assessed iron absorption from porridges prepared from the same LPM (lpa-1-1 mutant) and unmodified wild-type maize (WTM), both of which were fortified with either ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA. DESIGN: Porridges providing 3.4 mg Fe were fortified with either ferrous sulfate or sodium iron EDTA to provide an additional 1 mg Fe/serving. In 14 nonanemic women, iron absorption was measured as the amount of radioiron incorporated into red blood cells (extrinsic tag method) 12 d after consumption of the study diets. RESULTS: No significant effect of phytate content on iron absorption was found when porridge was fortified with either sodium iron EDTA or ferrous sulfate. Fractional absorption of iron from WTM porridge fortified with sodium iron EDTA (5.73%) was 3.39 times greater than that from the same porridge fortified with ferrous sulfate (1.69%). Fractional absorption of iron from the sodium iron EDTA-fortified LPM porridge (5.40%) was 2.82 times greater than that from LPM porridge fortified with ferrous sulfate (1.91%) (P<0.0001 for both comparisons, repeated-measures analysis of variance). Thus, the previously identified benefit of LPM was no longer detectable when maize porridge was fortified with additional iron. CONCLUSION: Iron was absorbed more efficiently when the fortificant was sodium iron EDTA rather than ferrous sulfate, regardless of the type of maize. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11124754/Absorption_of_iron_from_unmodified_maize_and_genetically_altered_low_phytate_maize_fortified_with_ferrous_sulfate_or_sodium_iron_EDTA_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/73.1.80 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -