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Placental ratio and anemia in third-trimester pregnancy.
J Reprod Med. 2000 Nov; 45(11):923-8.JR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To perform a prospective, observational study in a tertiary center to determine whether anemia (hemoglobin level < 10 g/dL) developing in the third trimester was associated with an increased placental weight/birth weight ratio (placental ratio) and whether the placental ratio correlated with the hemoglobin level at different periods and with other factors, such as gestational age and parity.

STUDY DESIGN

A total of 476 nonanemic women with low-risk singleton pregnancies were recruited at their 28-30-week antenatal visit over a three-month period. Excluded from the final analysis were 20 women who delivered elsewhere and 19 found to be carriers of thalassemia traits due to their low mean cell volume. All women received standard obstetric care, and ferrous sulphate was prescribed for those who developed anemia.

RESULTS

Anemia developed in 45 (10.3%) of the remaining 437 women. This group had significantly decreased red cell indices, gestational age (38.3 +/- 2.0 vs. 39.2 +/- 1.3 weeks, P = .004) and birth weight (3,082 +/- 416 vs. 3,220 +/- 411 g, P = .035) but no difference in placental weight (609 +/- 102 vs. 594 +/- 108 g), so the placental ratio was increased as compared with that in the control group (0.196 +/- 0.026 vs. 0.185 +/- 0.026, P = .002). Multiple regression analysis confirmed that the placental ratio correlated only with the last hemoglobin level (P = .041).

CONCLUSION

Our results indicate that placental size increased relative to infant size in pregnancies complicated by anemia, but whether this phenomenon reflected actual placental hypertrophy or failure of fetal growth to keep up with placental growth remains to be determined.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Tsan Yuk Hospital, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11127105

Citation

Lao, T T., and K F. Tam. "Placental Ratio and Anemia in Third-trimester Pregnancy." The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, vol. 45, no. 11, 2000, pp. 923-8.
Lao TT, Tam KF. Placental ratio and anemia in third-trimester pregnancy. J Reprod Med. 2000;45(11):923-8.
Lao, T. T., & Tam, K. F. (2000). Placental ratio and anemia in third-trimester pregnancy. The Journal of Reproductive Medicine, 45(11), 923-8.
Lao TT, Tam KF. Placental Ratio and Anemia in Third-trimester Pregnancy. J Reprod Med. 2000;45(11):923-8. PubMed PMID: 11127105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Placental ratio and anemia in third-trimester pregnancy. AU - Lao,T T, AU - Tam,K F, PY - 2000/12/29/pubmed PY - 2001/3/3/medline PY - 2000/12/29/entrez SP - 923 EP - 8 JF - The Journal of reproductive medicine JO - J Reprod Med VL - 45 IS - 11 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To perform a prospective, observational study in a tertiary center to determine whether anemia (hemoglobin level < 10 g/dL) developing in the third trimester was associated with an increased placental weight/birth weight ratio (placental ratio) and whether the placental ratio correlated with the hemoglobin level at different periods and with other factors, such as gestational age and parity. STUDY DESIGN: A total of 476 nonanemic women with low-risk singleton pregnancies were recruited at their 28-30-week antenatal visit over a three-month period. Excluded from the final analysis were 20 women who delivered elsewhere and 19 found to be carriers of thalassemia traits due to their low mean cell volume. All women received standard obstetric care, and ferrous sulphate was prescribed for those who developed anemia. RESULTS: Anemia developed in 45 (10.3%) of the remaining 437 women. This group had significantly decreased red cell indices, gestational age (38.3 +/- 2.0 vs. 39.2 +/- 1.3 weeks, P = .004) and birth weight (3,082 +/- 416 vs. 3,220 +/- 411 g, P = .035) but no difference in placental weight (609 +/- 102 vs. 594 +/- 108 g), so the placental ratio was increased as compared with that in the control group (0.196 +/- 0.026 vs. 0.185 +/- 0.026, P = .002). Multiple regression analysis confirmed that the placental ratio correlated only with the last hemoglobin level (P = .041). CONCLUSION: Our results indicate that placental size increased relative to infant size in pregnancies complicated by anemia, but whether this phenomenon reflected actual placental hypertrophy or failure of fetal growth to keep up with placental growth remains to be determined. SN - 0024-7758 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11127105/Placental_ratio_and_anemia_in_third_trimester_pregnancy_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/5922 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -