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Prevalence and patterns of problematic sleep among older adolescents.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000 Dec; 39(12):1549-56.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Despite many constraints on time schedules among teenagers, epidemiological data on sleep complaints in adolescence remain limited and are nonexistent for sleep disorders. This study provides additional data on sleep habits and DSM-IV sleep disorders in late adolescence.

METHOD

A representative sample of 1,125 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years was interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. These adolescents came from 4 European countries: France, Great Britain, Germany, and Italy. Information was collected about sociodemographic characteristics, sleep/wake schedule, sleep habits, and sleep disorders and was compared with information from 2,169 young adults (19-24 years of age).

RESULTS

Compared with young adults, adolescents presented with a distinct sleep/wake schedule: they went to sleep earlier, they woke up later, and they slept longer than young adults did. On weekends and days off, they also slept more than young adults did. However, the prevalence rates of sleep symptoms and sleep disorders were comparable in both groups. Approximately 25% reported insomnia symptoms and approximately 4% had a DSM-IV insomnia disorder. Fewer than 0.5% had a circadian rhythm disorder.

CONCLUSIONS

Prevalence of insomnia disorders is lower in the adolescent population than in middle-aged or elderly adults. However, a rate of 4% in this young population is important given their young age and the consequences for daytime functioning.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Sleep Disorders Center, Stanford University School of Medicine, CA 94305, USA. mrcohayon@aol.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11128333

Citation

Ohayon, M M., et al. "Prevalence and Patterns of Problematic Sleep Among Older Adolescents." Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 39, no. 12, 2000, pp. 1549-56.
Ohayon MM, Roberts RE, Zulley J, et al. Prevalence and patterns of problematic sleep among older adolescents. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000;39(12):1549-56.
Ohayon, M. M., Roberts, R. E., Zulley, J., Smirne, S., & Priest, R. G. (2000). Prevalence and patterns of problematic sleep among older adolescents. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 39(12), 1549-56.
Ohayon MM, et al. Prevalence and Patterns of Problematic Sleep Among Older Adolescents. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2000;39(12):1549-56. PubMed PMID: 11128333.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prevalence and patterns of problematic sleep among older adolescents. AU - Ohayon,M M, AU - Roberts,R E, AU - Zulley,J, AU - Smirne,S, AU - Priest,R G, PY - 2000/12/29/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2000/12/29/entrez SP - 1549 EP - 56 JF - Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry JO - J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry VL - 39 IS - 12 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Despite many constraints on time schedules among teenagers, epidemiological data on sleep complaints in adolescence remain limited and are nonexistent for sleep disorders. This study provides additional data on sleep habits and DSM-IV sleep disorders in late adolescence. METHOD: A representative sample of 1,125 adolescents aged 15 to 18 years was interviewed by telephone using the Sleep-EVAL system. These adolescents came from 4 European countries: France, Great Britain, Germany, and Italy. Information was collected about sociodemographic characteristics, sleep/wake schedule, sleep habits, and sleep disorders and was compared with information from 2,169 young adults (19-24 years of age). RESULTS: Compared with young adults, adolescents presented with a distinct sleep/wake schedule: they went to sleep earlier, they woke up later, and they slept longer than young adults did. On weekends and days off, they also slept more than young adults did. However, the prevalence rates of sleep symptoms and sleep disorders were comparable in both groups. Approximately 25% reported insomnia symptoms and approximately 4% had a DSM-IV insomnia disorder. Fewer than 0.5% had a circadian rhythm disorder. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of insomnia disorders is lower in the adolescent population than in middle-aged or elderly adults. However, a rate of 4% in this young population is important given their young age and the consequences for daytime functioning. SN - 0890-8567 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11128333/Prevalence_and_patterns_of_problematic_sleep_among_older_adolescents_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -