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Liposomal doxorubicin and weekly paclitaxel in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer.

Abstract

The combination of paclitaxel and doxorubicin or epirubicin is highly active against metastatic breast cancer, yet may produce congestive heart failure. Liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin is a new formulation of doxorubicin with no dose-limiting cardiac toxicity. Twenty-one patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (20 mg/m2, day 1) and paclitaxel (100 mg/m2, days 1 and 8) for six cycles every 2 weeks. All patients had had relapse or progression on one to five previous chemotherapies. We observed two patients with complete and eight patients with partial remissions (48% response rate). Eight of the 10 responders had had previous therapy with epirubicin, doxorubicin or mitoxantrone. The mean remission duration was 5 months. Disease progression due to brain metastasis occurred in five cases. Severe side effects (grade 3 WHO) were alopecia (100%), skin toxicity in 29%, neuropathy in 24% and mucositis in 13%. Leukopenia (grade 4 WHO) was observed in 48%, but there was no cardiac toxicity, no death and no hospitalization. The combination of weekly paclitaxel and liposomal doxorubicin every 2 weeks is highly effective in previously treated patients. Based on the doses we administered, we recommend 15 mg/m2 liposomal doxorubicin every 2 weeks and 80 mg/m2 paclitaxel weekly.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Internal Medicine II, St Walburga-Hospital, Meschede, Germany. walburga.khs.edv@gmx.de

    ,

    Source

    Anti-cancer drugs 11:9 2000 Oct pg 681-5

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols
    Breast Neoplasms
    Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
    Doxorubicin
    Drug Administration Schedule
    Female
    Humans
    Liposomes
    Middle Aged
    Neoplasm Metastasis
    Paclitaxel
    Pilot Projects
    Polyethylene Glycols

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Clinical Trial, Phase I
    Clinical Trial, Phase II
    Journal Article
    Multicenter Study

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11129728

    Citation

    TY - JOUR T1 - Liposomal doxorubicin and weekly paclitaxel in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. AU - Schwonzen,M, AU - Kurbacher,C M, AU - Mallmann,P, PY - 2000/12/29/pubmed PY - 2001/3/3/medline PY - 2000/12/29/entrez SP - 681 EP - 5 JF - Anti-cancer drugs JO - Anticancer Drugs VL - 11 IS - 9 N2 - The combination of paclitaxel and doxorubicin or epirubicin is highly active against metastatic breast cancer, yet may produce congestive heart failure. Liposome-encapsulated doxorubicin is a new formulation of doxorubicin with no dose-limiting cardiac toxicity. Twenty-one patients with metastatic breast cancer were treated with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (20 mg/m2, day 1) and paclitaxel (100 mg/m2, days 1 and 8) for six cycles every 2 weeks. All patients had had relapse or progression on one to five previous chemotherapies. We observed two patients with complete and eight patients with partial remissions (48% response rate). Eight of the 10 responders had had previous therapy with epirubicin, doxorubicin or mitoxantrone. The mean remission duration was 5 months. Disease progression due to brain metastasis occurred in five cases. Severe side effects (grade 3 WHO) were alopecia (100%), skin toxicity in 29%, neuropathy in 24% and mucositis in 13%. Leukopenia (grade 4 WHO) was observed in 48%, but there was no cardiac toxicity, no death and no hospitalization. The combination of weekly paclitaxel and liposomal doxorubicin every 2 weeks is highly effective in previously treated patients. Based on the doses we administered, we recommend 15 mg/m2 liposomal doxorubicin every 2 weeks and 80 mg/m2 paclitaxel weekly. SN - 0959-4973 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11129728/full_citation/Liposomal_doxorubicin_and_weekly_paclitaxel_in_the_treatment_of_metastatic_breast_cancer_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=11129728 ER -