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The applicability of WHO-NCTB in Korea.
Neurotoxicology. 2000 Oct; 21(5):697-701.N

Abstract

Neurotoxic chemical substances have been widely used in Korea since 1960. The World Health Organization-recommended Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery (WHO-NCTB) was introduced into Korea early in the 1990s and has been applied to the study of workers exposed to neurotoxic chemicals. Thirteen studies using the WHO-NCTB have been reported in Korean journals, two of which were published in English and the rest in Korean-language journals. Ten studies were reviewed to examine the influence of age, education and other factors on the WHO-NCTB in Korean workers. Pursuit Aiming, Digit Symbol, Digit Span and Benton Visual Retention test are effected by years of education, especially when years of education were less than 12. Santa Ana Dexterity test and Simple Reaction Time test were not effected. Pursuit Aiming, Santa Ana Dexterity test and Digit Symbol were effected by age, but not the Simple Reaction Time test, Benton Visual Retention test, or Digit Span. Some studies had difficulty in finding a proper reference group, because many workers exposed to neurotoxic chemicals were old and less educated than available reference groups. However, daily use of chopsticks by Koreans, especially coupled with work that requires skillful and quick hand movements, might develop psychomotor functions in exposed workers. The cultural and emotional differences between Korean and Caucasian led POMS to be applied only to two studies. In conclusion, the WHO-NCTB has been successfully applied to Korean workers for evaluating the neurobehavioral effects of individual chemicals, although age and education can be confounding factors. It was difficult to apply the WHO-NCTB to workers educated less than 12 years.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute, Korea Occupational Safety and Health Agency, Inchon, The Republic of Korea. skk@kosha.net

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11130273

Citation

Kang, S K.. "The Applicability of WHO-NCTB in Korea." Neurotoxicology, vol. 21, no. 5, 2000, pp. 697-701.
Kang SK. The applicability of WHO-NCTB in Korea. Neurotoxicology. 2000;21(5):697-701.
Kang, S. K. (2000). The applicability of WHO-NCTB in Korea. Neurotoxicology, 21(5), 697-701.
Kang SK. The Applicability of WHO-NCTB in Korea. Neurotoxicology. 2000;21(5):697-701. PubMed PMID: 11130273.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The applicability of WHO-NCTB in Korea. A1 - Kang,S K, PY - 2000/12/29/pubmed PY - 2001/3/7/medline PY - 2000/12/29/entrez SP - 697 EP - 701 JF - Neurotoxicology JO - Neurotoxicology VL - 21 IS - 5 N2 - Neurotoxic chemical substances have been widely used in Korea since 1960. The World Health Organization-recommended Neurobehavioral Core Test Battery (WHO-NCTB) was introduced into Korea early in the 1990s and has been applied to the study of workers exposed to neurotoxic chemicals. Thirteen studies using the WHO-NCTB have been reported in Korean journals, two of which were published in English and the rest in Korean-language journals. Ten studies were reviewed to examine the influence of age, education and other factors on the WHO-NCTB in Korean workers. Pursuit Aiming, Digit Symbol, Digit Span and Benton Visual Retention test are effected by years of education, especially when years of education were less than 12. Santa Ana Dexterity test and Simple Reaction Time test were not effected. Pursuit Aiming, Santa Ana Dexterity test and Digit Symbol were effected by age, but not the Simple Reaction Time test, Benton Visual Retention test, or Digit Span. Some studies had difficulty in finding a proper reference group, because many workers exposed to neurotoxic chemicals were old and less educated than available reference groups. However, daily use of chopsticks by Koreans, especially coupled with work that requires skillful and quick hand movements, might develop psychomotor functions in exposed workers. The cultural and emotional differences between Korean and Caucasian led POMS to be applied only to two studies. In conclusion, the WHO-NCTB has been successfully applied to Korean workers for evaluating the neurobehavioral effects of individual chemicals, although age and education can be confounding factors. It was difficult to apply the WHO-NCTB to workers educated less than 12 years. SN - 0161-813X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11130273/The_applicability_of_WHO_NCTB_in_Korea_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/occupationalhealth.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -