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Anaemia in pregnant Ghanaian women: importance of malaria, iron deficiency, and haemoglobinopathies.
Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2000 Sep-Oct; 94(5):477-83.TR

Abstract

In sub-Saharan Africa, anaemia in pregnancy results from multiple causes including malaria, iron deficiency and haemoglobinopathies. In a cross-sectional study among 530 pregnant women in Ghana in November-December 1998, red blood cell indices were analysed with respect to malaria, serum concentrations of ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP), and the haemoglobin and alpha-globin genotypes. Anaemia (haemoglobin [Hb] < 11 g/dL) was found in 54% of the women; 63% harboured malaria parasites at predominantly low numbers. Ferritin levels were considerably influenced by malaria and inflammatory processes (CRP > 0.6 mg/dL). Depending on the definition applied, the prevalence of iron deficiency ranged between 5% and 46%. The HbAS trait was observed in 14%, HbAC and elevated HbF in 7% each, and sickle cell disease in 1%. Heterozygous beta-thalassaemia was present in 1% of the women and alpha(+)-thalassaemia in 33% (29% heterozygous, 4% homozygous). Women with HbAS had higher malaria parasite densities than those with HbAA. In individuals with highly elevated HbF (> 10%), parasitaemia occurred in 27% only. Low gravidity, second trimester of pregnancy, malaria, raised CRP levels, and homozygous alpha(+)-thalassaemia were independent risk factors for anaemia in multivariate analysis. alpha(+)-Thalassaemia, however, was associated with a lesser degree of malarial anaemia when compared to non-thalassaemic women. Iron deficiency appears not to be a major health problem in this population. Haemoglobinopathies are common but, except for homozygous alpha(+)-thalassaemia, do not substantially contribute to anaemia in pregnancy. alpha(+)-Thalassaemia ameliorates malarial anaemia in pregnant women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institut für Tropenmedizin, Medizinische Fakultät Charité, Humboldt Universität zu Berlin, Germany. frank.mockenhaupt@charite.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11132370

Citation

Mockenhaupt, F P., et al. "Anaemia in Pregnant Ghanaian Women: Importance of Malaria, Iron Deficiency, and Haemoglobinopathies." Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 94, no. 5, 2000, pp. 477-83.
Mockenhaupt FP, Rong B, Günther M, et al. Anaemia in pregnant Ghanaian women: importance of malaria, iron deficiency, and haemoglobinopathies. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2000;94(5):477-83.
Mockenhaupt, F. P., Rong, B., Günther, M., Beck, S., Till, H., Kohne, E., Thompson, W. N., & Bienzle, U. (2000). Anaemia in pregnant Ghanaian women: importance of malaria, iron deficiency, and haemoglobinopathies. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 94(5), 477-83.
Mockenhaupt FP, et al. Anaemia in Pregnant Ghanaian Women: Importance of Malaria, Iron Deficiency, and Haemoglobinopathies. Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg. 2000 Sep-Oct;94(5):477-83. PubMed PMID: 11132370.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Anaemia in pregnant Ghanaian women: importance of malaria, iron deficiency, and haemoglobinopathies. AU - Mockenhaupt,F P, AU - Rong,B, AU - Günther,M, AU - Beck,S, AU - Till,H, AU - Kohne,E, AU - Thompson,W N, AU - Bienzle,U, PY - 2001/1/2/pubmed PY - 2001/3/3/medline PY - 2001/1/2/entrez SP - 477 EP - 83 JF - Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene JO - Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg VL - 94 IS - 5 N2 - In sub-Saharan Africa, anaemia in pregnancy results from multiple causes including malaria, iron deficiency and haemoglobinopathies. In a cross-sectional study among 530 pregnant women in Ghana in November-December 1998, red blood cell indices were analysed with respect to malaria, serum concentrations of ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP), and the haemoglobin and alpha-globin genotypes. Anaemia (haemoglobin [Hb] < 11 g/dL) was found in 54% of the women; 63% harboured malaria parasites at predominantly low numbers. Ferritin levels were considerably influenced by malaria and inflammatory processes (CRP > 0.6 mg/dL). Depending on the definition applied, the prevalence of iron deficiency ranged between 5% and 46%. The HbAS trait was observed in 14%, HbAC and elevated HbF in 7% each, and sickle cell disease in 1%. Heterozygous beta-thalassaemia was present in 1% of the women and alpha(+)-thalassaemia in 33% (29% heterozygous, 4% homozygous). Women with HbAS had higher malaria parasite densities than those with HbAA. In individuals with highly elevated HbF (> 10%), parasitaemia occurred in 27% only. Low gravidity, second trimester of pregnancy, malaria, raised CRP levels, and homozygous alpha(+)-thalassaemia were independent risk factors for anaemia in multivariate analysis. alpha(+)-Thalassaemia, however, was associated with a lesser degree of malarial anaemia when compared to non-thalassaemic women. Iron deficiency appears not to be a major health problem in this population. Haemoglobinopathies are common but, except for homozygous alpha(+)-thalassaemia, do not substantially contribute to anaemia in pregnancy. alpha(+)-Thalassaemia ameliorates malarial anaemia in pregnant women. SN - 0035-9203 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11132370/Anaemia_in_pregnant_Ghanaian_women:_importance_of_malaria_iron_deficiency_and_haemoglobinopathies_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/trstmh/article-lookup/doi/10.1016/s0035-9203(00)90057-9 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -