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Vitamin C supplement use and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women.
J Bone Miner Res 2001; 16(1):135-40JB

Abstract

Vitamin C is known to stimulate procollagen, enhance collagen synthesis, and stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker for osteoblast formation. Studies of dietary vitamin C intake and the relation with bone mineral density (BMD) have been conflicting, probably because of the well-known limitations of dietary nutrient assessment questionnaires. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent relation of daily vitamin C supplement use with BMD in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women. Subjects were 994 women from a community-based cohort of whom 277 women were regular vitamin C supplement users. Vitamin C supplement use was validated. Daily vitamin C supplement intake ranged from 100 to 5,000 mg; the mean daily dose was 745 mg. Average duration of use was 12.4 years; 85% had taken vitamin C supplements for more than 3 years. BMD levels were measured at the ultradistal and midshaft radii, hip, and lumbar spine. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and total calcium intake, vitamin C users had BMD levels approximately 3% higher at the midshaft radius, femoral neck, and total hip (p < 0.05). In a fully adjusted model, significant differences remained at the femoral neck (p < 0.02) and marginal significance was observed at the total hip (p < 0.06). Women taking both estrogen and vitamin C had significantly higher BMD levels at all sites. Among current estrogen users, those also taking vitamin C had higher BMD levels at all sites, with marginal significance achieved at the ultradistal radius (p < 0.07), femoral neck (p < 0.07), and total hip (p < 0.09). Women who took vitamin C plus calcium and estrogen had the highest BMD at the femoral neck (p = 0.001), total hip (p = 0.05), ultradistal radius (p = 0.02), and lumbar spine. Vitamin C supplement use appears to have a beneficial effect on levels of BMD, especially among postmenopausal women using concurrent estrogen therapy and calcium supplements.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Family and Preventive Medicine, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11149477

Citation

Morton, D J., et al. "Vitamin C Supplement Use and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women." Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 16, no. 1, 2001, pp. 135-40.
Morton DJ, Barrett-Connor EL, Schneider DL. Vitamin C supplement use and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. J Bone Miner Res. 2001;16(1):135-40.
Morton, D. J., Barrett-Connor, E. L., & Schneider, D. L. (2001). Vitamin C supplement use and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. Journal of Bone and Mineral Research : the Official Journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, 16(1), pp. 135-40.
Morton DJ, Barrett-Connor EL, Schneider DL. Vitamin C Supplement Use and Bone Mineral Density in Postmenopausal Women. J Bone Miner Res. 2001;16(1):135-40. PubMed PMID: 11149477.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin C supplement use and bone mineral density in postmenopausal women. AU - Morton,D J, AU - Barrett-Connor,E L, AU - Schneider,D L, PY - 2001/1/10/pubmed PY - 2001/3/7/medline PY - 2001/1/10/entrez SP - 135 EP - 40 JF - Journal of bone and mineral research : the official journal of the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research JO - J. Bone Miner. Res. VL - 16 IS - 1 N2 - Vitamin C is known to stimulate procollagen, enhance collagen synthesis, and stimulate alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker for osteoblast formation. Studies of dietary vitamin C intake and the relation with bone mineral density (BMD) have been conflicting, probably because of the well-known limitations of dietary nutrient assessment questionnaires. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the independent relation of daily vitamin C supplement use with BMD in a population-based sample of postmenopausal women. Subjects were 994 women from a community-based cohort of whom 277 women were regular vitamin C supplement users. Vitamin C supplement use was validated. Daily vitamin C supplement intake ranged from 100 to 5,000 mg; the mean daily dose was 745 mg. Average duration of use was 12.4 years; 85% had taken vitamin C supplements for more than 3 years. BMD levels were measured at the ultradistal and midshaft radii, hip, and lumbar spine. After adjusting for age, body mass index (BMI), and total calcium intake, vitamin C users had BMD levels approximately 3% higher at the midshaft radius, femoral neck, and total hip (p < 0.05). In a fully adjusted model, significant differences remained at the femoral neck (p < 0.02) and marginal significance was observed at the total hip (p < 0.06). Women taking both estrogen and vitamin C had significantly higher BMD levels at all sites. Among current estrogen users, those also taking vitamin C had higher BMD levels at all sites, with marginal significance achieved at the ultradistal radius (p < 0.07), femoral neck (p < 0.07), and total hip (p < 0.09). Women who took vitamin C plus calcium and estrogen had the highest BMD at the femoral neck (p = 0.001), total hip (p = 0.05), ultradistal radius (p = 0.02), and lumbar spine. Vitamin C supplement use appears to have a beneficial effect on levels of BMD, especially among postmenopausal women using concurrent estrogen therapy and calcium supplements. SN - 0884-0431 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11149477/Vitamin_C_supplement_use_and_bone_mineral_density_in_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1359/jbmr.2001.16.1.135 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -