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Alzheimer's disease and its focal variants.
Semin Neurol 2000; 20(4):447-54SN

Abstract

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in elderly individuals. Although the diagnosis of AD requires pathological confirmation, several common clinical features of AD have been identified. These include insidious onset, gradual progression, medial temporal atrophy, temporoparietal hypoperfusion, early and prominent deficits in episodic memory and mental tracking, and later deficits in semantic memory. These characteristic features of AD have enabled excellent in vivo diagnostic sensitivity. It has become increasingly clear, however, that AD is a heterogeneous disorder. The left and right cerebral hemispheres can be affected to varying degrees, and variability on the anterior-posterior axis has also been reported. AD can also present as a focal degenerative disease, and clinicians must be aware that there may be diagnostic overlap between AD, primary progressive aphasia, posterior cortical atrophy, corticobasal degeneration, and frontotemporal dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of California, San Francisco Medical Center, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11149700

Citation

Kramer, J H., and B L. Miller. "Alzheimer's Disease and Its Focal Variants." Seminars in Neurology, vol. 20, no. 4, 2000, pp. 447-54.
Kramer JH, Miller BL. Alzheimer's disease and its focal variants. Semin Neurol. 2000;20(4):447-54.
Kramer, J. H., & Miller, B. L. (2000). Alzheimer's disease and its focal variants. Seminars in Neurology, 20(4), pp. 447-54.
Kramer JH, Miller BL. Alzheimer's Disease and Its Focal Variants. Semin Neurol. 2000;20(4):447-54. PubMed PMID: 11149700.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Alzheimer's disease and its focal variants. AU - Kramer,J H, AU - Miller,B L, PY - 2001/1/10/pubmed PY - 2001/3/27/medline PY - 2001/1/10/entrez SP - 447 EP - 54 JF - Seminars in neurology JO - Semin Neurol VL - 20 IS - 4 N2 - Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in elderly individuals. Although the diagnosis of AD requires pathological confirmation, several common clinical features of AD have been identified. These include insidious onset, gradual progression, medial temporal atrophy, temporoparietal hypoperfusion, early and prominent deficits in episodic memory and mental tracking, and later deficits in semantic memory. These characteristic features of AD have enabled excellent in vivo diagnostic sensitivity. It has become increasingly clear, however, that AD is a heterogeneous disorder. The left and right cerebral hemispheres can be affected to varying degrees, and variability on the anterior-posterior axis has also been reported. AD can also present as a focal degenerative disease, and clinicians must be aware that there may be diagnostic overlap between AD, primary progressive aphasia, posterior cortical atrophy, corticobasal degeneration, and frontotemporal dementia. SN - 0271-8235 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11149700/Alzheimer's_disease_and_its_focal_variants_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-2000-13177 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -