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Improving iron absorption from a Peruvian school breakfast meal by adding ascorbic acid or Na2EDTA.
Am J Clin Nutr. 2001 Feb; 73(2):283-7.AJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Iron-fortified school breakfasts have been introduced in Peru to combat childhood iron deficiency.

OBJECTIVE

We evaluated whether iron absorption from a school breakfast meal was improved by increasing the ascorbic acid content or by adding an alternative enhancer of iron absorption, Na2EDTA.

DESIGN

In a crossover design, iron absorption from test meals was evaluated by erythrocyte incorporation of 58Fe and 57Fe. The test meals (wheat bread and a drink containing cereal, milk, and soy) contained 14 mg added Fe (as ferrous sulfate) including 2.0-2.6 mg 58Fe or 4.0-7.0 mg 57Fe.

RESULTS

Geometric mean iron absorption increased significantly from 5.1% to 8.2% after the molar ratio of ascorbic acid to fortification iron was increased from 0.6:1 to 1.6:1 (P < 0.01; n = 9). Geometric mean iron absorption increased significantly from 2.9% to 3.8%, from 2.2% to 3.5%, and from 2.4% to 3.7% after addition of Na2EDTA at molar ratios relative to fortification iron of 0.3:1, 0.7:1, and 1:1, respectively, compared with test meals containing no added enhancers (P < 0.01; n = 10 for all). Iron absorption after addition of ascorbic acid (molar ratio 0.6:1) was not significantly different from that after addition of Na2EDTA (molar ratio 0.7:1).

CONCLUSIONS

Ascorbic acid and Na2EDTA did not differ significantly in their enhancing effects on iron absorption at molar ratios of 0.6:1 to 0.7:1 relative to fortification iron. Additional ascorbic acid (molar ratio 1.6:1) increased iron absorption significantly. Increasing the molar ratio of Na2EDTA to fortification iron from 0.3:1 to 1:1 had no effect on iron absorption.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory for Human Nutrition, Institute of Food Science, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Rüschlikon, Switzerland. davidsson@ilw.agrl.ethz.chNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11157325

Citation

Davidsson, L, et al. "Improving Iron Absorption From a Peruvian School Breakfast Meal By Adding Ascorbic Acid or Na2EDTA." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 73, no. 2, 2001, pp. 283-7.
Davidsson L, Walczyk T, Zavaleta N, et al. Improving iron absorption from a Peruvian school breakfast meal by adding ascorbic acid or Na2EDTA. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73(2):283-7.
Davidsson, L., Walczyk, T., Zavaleta, N., & Hurrell, R. (2001). Improving iron absorption from a Peruvian school breakfast meal by adding ascorbic acid or Na2EDTA. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 73(2), 283-7.
Davidsson L, et al. Improving Iron Absorption From a Peruvian School Breakfast Meal By Adding Ascorbic Acid or Na2EDTA. Am J Clin Nutr. 2001;73(2):283-7. PubMed PMID: 11157325.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Improving iron absorption from a Peruvian school breakfast meal by adding ascorbic acid or Na2EDTA. AU - Davidsson,L, AU - Walczyk,T, AU - Zavaleta,N, AU - Hurrell,R, PY - 2001/2/7/pubmed PY - 2001/3/17/medline PY - 2001/2/7/entrez SP - 283 EP - 7 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am J Clin Nutr VL - 73 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Iron-fortified school breakfasts have been introduced in Peru to combat childhood iron deficiency. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated whether iron absorption from a school breakfast meal was improved by increasing the ascorbic acid content or by adding an alternative enhancer of iron absorption, Na2EDTA. DESIGN: In a crossover design, iron absorption from test meals was evaluated by erythrocyte incorporation of 58Fe and 57Fe. The test meals (wheat bread and a drink containing cereal, milk, and soy) contained 14 mg added Fe (as ferrous sulfate) including 2.0-2.6 mg 58Fe or 4.0-7.0 mg 57Fe. RESULTS: Geometric mean iron absorption increased significantly from 5.1% to 8.2% after the molar ratio of ascorbic acid to fortification iron was increased from 0.6:1 to 1.6:1 (P < 0.01; n = 9). Geometric mean iron absorption increased significantly from 2.9% to 3.8%, from 2.2% to 3.5%, and from 2.4% to 3.7% after addition of Na2EDTA at molar ratios relative to fortification iron of 0.3:1, 0.7:1, and 1:1, respectively, compared with test meals containing no added enhancers (P < 0.01; n = 10 for all). Iron absorption after addition of ascorbic acid (molar ratio 0.6:1) was not significantly different from that after addition of Na2EDTA (molar ratio 0.7:1). CONCLUSIONS: Ascorbic acid and Na2EDTA did not differ significantly in their enhancing effects on iron absorption at molar ratios of 0.6:1 to 0.7:1 relative to fortification iron. Additional ascorbic acid (molar ratio 1.6:1) increased iron absorption significantly. Increasing the molar ratio of Na2EDTA to fortification iron from 0.3:1 to 1:1 had no effect on iron absorption. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11157325/Improving_iron_absorption_from_a_Peruvian_school_breakfast_meal_by_adding_ascorbic_acid_or_Na2EDTA_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/73.2.283 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -