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Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid results in a more favorable serum lipid profile in healthy men and women than consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids.
J Nutr. 2001 Feb; 131(2):242-5.JN

Abstract

Solid fats are used in food manufacturing to provide texture and firmness to foods. Such fats are rich in either saturated or trans-fatty acids, both of which increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that trans-fatty acids increase risk more than do saturates because they lower serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. However, there appear to be differences between saturates in their effect on HDL cholesterol. We investigated whether the consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid (C12:0) would result in a more favorable blood lipid profile than the consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids. We fed 32 healthy men and women two controlled diets in a 2 x 4-wk randomized crossover design. The diets consisted of a background diet supplemented with margarines. In the trans-diet, 9.2% of energy was provided by trans-fatty acids and 12.9% by saturated fatty acids. In the Sat-diet, energy intake was 0% from trans-fatty acids and 22.9% from saturated fatty acids. Lauric acid composed one third of all saturates in the Sat-diet. Serum HDL cholesterol was 0.36 mmol/L lower at the end of the trans-diet than at the end of the Sat-diet (95% confidence interval, -0.46 to -0.26), whereas serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations remained stable. Serum total cholesterol was 0.31 mmol/L (95% confidence interval, -0.48 to -0.14) lower at the end of the trans-diet than at the end of the Sat-diet. Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid gives a more favorable serum lipoprotein pattern than consumption of partially hydrogenated soybean oil rich in trans-fatty acids. Thus, solid fats rich in lauric acids, such as tropical fats, appear to be preferable to trans-fats in food manufacturing, where hard fats are indispensable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Human Nutrition and Epidemiology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, the Netherlands. nicole.deroos@staff.nutepi.wau.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11160540

Citation

de Roos, N, et al. "Consumption of a Solid Fat Rich in Lauric Acid Results in a More Favorable Serum Lipid Profile in Healthy Men and Women Than Consumption of a Solid Fat Rich in Trans-fatty Acids." The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 131, no. 2, 2001, pp. 242-5.
de Roos N, Schouten E, Katan M. Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid results in a more favorable serum lipid profile in healthy men and women than consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids. J Nutr. 2001;131(2):242-5.
de Roos, N., Schouten, E., & Katan, M. (2001). Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid results in a more favorable serum lipid profile in healthy men and women than consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids. The Journal of Nutrition, 131(2), 242-5.
de Roos N, Schouten E, Katan M. Consumption of a Solid Fat Rich in Lauric Acid Results in a More Favorable Serum Lipid Profile in Healthy Men and Women Than Consumption of a Solid Fat Rich in Trans-fatty Acids. J Nutr. 2001;131(2):242-5. PubMed PMID: 11160540.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid results in a more favorable serum lipid profile in healthy men and women than consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids. AU - de Roos,N, AU - Schouten,E, AU - Katan,M, PY - 2001/2/13/pubmed PY - 2001/4/3/medline PY - 2001/2/13/entrez SP - 242 EP - 5 JF - The Journal of nutrition JO - J. Nutr. VL - 131 IS - 2 N2 - Solid fats are used in food manufacturing to provide texture and firmness to foods. Such fats are rich in either saturated or trans-fatty acids, both of which increase the risk of coronary heart disease. Epidemiological and experimental studies suggest that trans-fatty acids increase risk more than do saturates because they lower serum high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. However, there appear to be differences between saturates in their effect on HDL cholesterol. We investigated whether the consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid (C12:0) would result in a more favorable blood lipid profile than the consumption of a solid fat rich in trans-fatty acids. We fed 32 healthy men and women two controlled diets in a 2 x 4-wk randomized crossover design. The diets consisted of a background diet supplemented with margarines. In the trans-diet, 9.2% of energy was provided by trans-fatty acids and 12.9% by saturated fatty acids. In the Sat-diet, energy intake was 0% from trans-fatty acids and 22.9% from saturated fatty acids. Lauric acid composed one third of all saturates in the Sat-diet. Serum HDL cholesterol was 0.36 mmol/L lower at the end of the trans-diet than at the end of the Sat-diet (95% confidence interval, -0.46 to -0.26), whereas serum low density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations remained stable. Serum total cholesterol was 0.31 mmol/L (95% confidence interval, -0.48 to -0.14) lower at the end of the trans-diet than at the end of the Sat-diet. Consumption of a solid fat rich in lauric acid gives a more favorable serum lipoprotein pattern than consumption of partially hydrogenated soybean oil rich in trans-fatty acids. Thus, solid fats rich in lauric acids, such as tropical fats, appear to be preferable to trans-fats in food manufacturing, where hard fats are indispensable. SN - 0022-3166 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11160540/Consumption_of_a_solid_fat_rich_in_lauric_acid_results_in_a_more_favorable_serum_lipid_profile_in_healthy_men_and_women_than_consumption_of_a_solid_fat_rich_in_trans_fatty_acids_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/jn/131.2.242 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -