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A prospective study of blood pressure and risk of cataract in men.
Ann Epidemiol. 2001 Feb; 11(2):104-10.AE

Abstract

PURPOSE

Cataract is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. Blood pressure has been identified as a risk factor in some, but not all, previous studies. We aimed to test prospectively the hypothesis that high blood pressure increases risk of age-related cataract.

METHODS

Participants in the Physicians' Health Study of 22,071 men aged 40 to 84 years in 1982 completed annual questionnaires that provided medical history including self-reported blood pressure, treatment for hypertension, and cataract. Over 12 years, 1392 cataracts were confirmed by medical record review among 17,762 physicians with complete data and no reported cataract at baseline. We used proportional hazards regression models to examine relations of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), hypertension, as well as antihypertensive medications with cataract, after control for potential confounding factors.

RESULTS

In models adjusting for age and randomized treatment assignment, there was a significant relationship of SBP, but not DBP, hypertension, or antihypertensive medications (each p > or = 0.23) with incident cataract. Estimates were attenuated after adjusting for multiple potential confounders, although the relationship of SBP with incident cataract remained significant. The multivariate adjusted rate ratio (95% confidence interval) of cataract for SBP > or = 150 versus < 120 mm Hg was 1.31 (1.04-1.66), p for trend = 0.04. For DBP > or = 90 versus < 70 mm Hg, the estimate was 1.11 (0.84-1.45), p for trend = 0.33.

CONCLUSIONS

Overall, these data suggest that the relationship of blood pressure with cataract is not strong, and is subject to confounding by other risk factors. The modest magnitude of the association with SBP and lack of significant relationships with DBP and hypertension may suggest a non-causal relationship of blood pressure with cataract.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Preventive Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02215, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11164126

Citation

Schaumberg, D A., et al. "A Prospective Study of Blood Pressure and Risk of Cataract in Men." Annals of Epidemiology, vol. 11, no. 2, 2001, pp. 104-10.
Schaumberg DA, Glynn RJ, Christen WG, et al. A prospective study of blood pressure and risk of cataract in men. Ann Epidemiol. 2001;11(2):104-10.
Schaumberg, D. A., Glynn, R. J., Christen, W. G., Ajani, U. A., Stürmer, T., & Hennekens, C. H. (2001). A prospective study of blood pressure and risk of cataract in men. Annals of Epidemiology, 11(2), 104-10.
Schaumberg DA, et al. A Prospective Study of Blood Pressure and Risk of Cataract in Men. Ann Epidemiol. 2001;11(2):104-10. PubMed PMID: 11164126.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of blood pressure and risk of cataract in men. AU - Schaumberg,D A, AU - Glynn,R J, AU - Christen,W G, AU - Ajani,U A, AU - Stürmer,T, AU - Hennekens,C H, PY - 2001/2/13/pubmed PY - 2001/4/6/medline PY - 2001/2/13/entrez SP - 104 EP - 10 JF - Annals of epidemiology JO - Ann Epidemiol VL - 11 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Cataract is the leading cause of blindness worldwide. Blood pressure has been identified as a risk factor in some, but not all, previous studies. We aimed to test prospectively the hypothesis that high blood pressure increases risk of age-related cataract. METHODS: Participants in the Physicians' Health Study of 22,071 men aged 40 to 84 years in 1982 completed annual questionnaires that provided medical history including self-reported blood pressure, treatment for hypertension, and cataract. Over 12 years, 1392 cataracts were confirmed by medical record review among 17,762 physicians with complete data and no reported cataract at baseline. We used proportional hazards regression models to examine relations of systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), hypertension, as well as antihypertensive medications with cataract, after control for potential confounding factors. RESULTS: In models adjusting for age and randomized treatment assignment, there was a significant relationship of SBP, but not DBP, hypertension, or antihypertensive medications (each p > or = 0.23) with incident cataract. Estimates were attenuated after adjusting for multiple potential confounders, although the relationship of SBP with incident cataract remained significant. The multivariate adjusted rate ratio (95% confidence interval) of cataract for SBP > or = 150 versus < 120 mm Hg was 1.31 (1.04-1.66), p for trend = 0.04. For DBP > or = 90 versus < 70 mm Hg, the estimate was 1.11 (0.84-1.45), p for trend = 0.33. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, these data suggest that the relationship of blood pressure with cataract is not strong, and is subject to confounding by other risk factors. The modest magnitude of the association with SBP and lack of significant relationships with DBP and hypertension may suggest a non-causal relationship of blood pressure with cataract. SN - 1047-2797 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11164126/A_prospective_study_of_blood_pressure_and_risk_of_cataract_in_men_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1047-2797(00)00178-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -