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Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: interaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy for prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ulcers and ulcer complications--future research needs.
Am J Med. 2001 Jan 08; 110(1A):58S-61S.AJ

Abstract

Two recently reported studies of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the Omeprazole versus Misoprostol for NSAID-induced Ulcer Management and the Acid Suppression Trial: Ranitidine versus Omeprazole for NSAID-associated Ulcer Treatment studies, concluded that omeprazole was superior to a subtherapeutic misoprostol or an ineffective dose of ranitidine for the endpoint, prevention of gastroduodenal ulcers in chronic NSAID users. Helicobacter pylori status was collected prospectively but was not reported. We report separate analyses for patients with unequivocal NSAID ulcers (H. pylori negative) and patients whose NSAID use was complicated by the presence of an active H. pylori infection. Omeprazole was superior to placebo for the prevention of ulcer recurrence in chronic NSAID users. However, omeprazole was not significantly better than a subtherapeutic dose of misoprostol for the prevention of gastroduodenal ulcers in chronic NSAID users. Misoprostol was superior to omeprazole for the prevention of gastric ulcers among those patients with unequivocal NSAID ulcers (8.2% vs 16.6%, respectively; P <0.05). Omeprazole was not statistically different from misoprostol for gastric ulcer prevention in those whose NSAID use was complicated by an active H. pylori infection. Ranitidine and omeprazole were also not statistically different for the prevention of unequivocal NSAID gastric ulcers (14.6% vs 11.6%, respectively; P = 0.56). That the Misoprostol Ulcer Complications Outcomes Safety Assessment (MUCOSA) trial found full-dose misoprostol to be more effective in ulcer prevention than it was in prevention of ulcer complications suggests that either many of the ulcer complications were related to H. pylori ulcers or that more antisecretory activity than can be provided with misoprostol is needed, or both. The question remains whether the combination of low-dose misoprostol plus an antisecretory drug (either an H(2)-receptor antagonist or a proton pump inhibitor) would provide superior results compared with either alone. That omeprazole was not superior to one half the dose of misoprostol used in the ulcer complication prevention, or MUCOSA, study indicates that it would not be prudent to suggest that ulcer prevention with omeprazole alone would be able to provide similar protection to misoprostol.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11166000

Citation

Graham, D Y.. "Helicobacter Pylori and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs: Interaction With Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy for Prevention of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Ulcers and Ulcer Complications--future Research Needs." The American Journal of Medicine, vol. 110, no. 1A, 2001, 58S-61S.
Graham DY. Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: interaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy for prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ulcers and ulcer complications--future research needs. Am J Med. 2001;110(1A):58S-61S.
Graham, D. Y. (2001). Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: interaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy for prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ulcers and ulcer complications--future research needs. The American Journal of Medicine, 110(1A), 58S-61S.
Graham DY. Helicobacter Pylori and Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs: Interaction With Proton Pump Inhibitor Therapy for Prevention of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drug Ulcers and Ulcer Complications--future Research Needs. Am J Med. 2001 Jan 8;110(1A):58S-61S. PubMed PMID: 11166000.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs: interaction with proton pump inhibitor therapy for prevention of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug ulcers and ulcer complications--future research needs. A1 - Graham,D Y, PY - 2001/2/13/pubmed PY - 2001/4/3/medline PY - 2001/2/13/entrez SP - 58S EP - 61S JF - The American journal of medicine JO - Am J Med VL - 110 IS - 1A N2 - Two recently reported studies of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), the Omeprazole versus Misoprostol for NSAID-induced Ulcer Management and the Acid Suppression Trial: Ranitidine versus Omeprazole for NSAID-associated Ulcer Treatment studies, concluded that omeprazole was superior to a subtherapeutic misoprostol or an ineffective dose of ranitidine for the endpoint, prevention of gastroduodenal ulcers in chronic NSAID users. Helicobacter pylori status was collected prospectively but was not reported. We report separate analyses for patients with unequivocal NSAID ulcers (H. pylori negative) and patients whose NSAID use was complicated by the presence of an active H. pylori infection. Omeprazole was superior to placebo for the prevention of ulcer recurrence in chronic NSAID users. However, omeprazole was not significantly better than a subtherapeutic dose of misoprostol for the prevention of gastroduodenal ulcers in chronic NSAID users. Misoprostol was superior to omeprazole for the prevention of gastric ulcers among those patients with unequivocal NSAID ulcers (8.2% vs 16.6%, respectively; P <0.05). Omeprazole was not statistically different from misoprostol for gastric ulcer prevention in those whose NSAID use was complicated by an active H. pylori infection. Ranitidine and omeprazole were also not statistically different for the prevention of unequivocal NSAID gastric ulcers (14.6% vs 11.6%, respectively; P = 0.56). That the Misoprostol Ulcer Complications Outcomes Safety Assessment (MUCOSA) trial found full-dose misoprostol to be more effective in ulcer prevention than it was in prevention of ulcer complications suggests that either many of the ulcer complications were related to H. pylori ulcers or that more antisecretory activity than can be provided with misoprostol is needed, or both. The question remains whether the combination of low-dose misoprostol plus an antisecretory drug (either an H(2)-receptor antagonist or a proton pump inhibitor) would provide superior results compared with either alone. That omeprazole was not superior to one half the dose of misoprostol used in the ulcer complication prevention, or MUCOSA, study indicates that it would not be prudent to suggest that ulcer prevention with omeprazole alone would be able to provide similar protection to misoprostol. SN - 0002-9343 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11166000/Helicobacter_pylori_and_nonsteroidal_anti_inflammatory_drugs:_interaction_with_proton_pump_inhibitor_therapy_for_prevention_of_nonsteroidal_anti_inflammatory_drug_ulcers_and_ulcer_complications__future_research_needs_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002934300006446 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -