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Effect of meal fat quality on oxidation resistance of postprandial VLDL and LDL particles and plasma triacylglycerol level.
Br J Nutr. 2000 Dec; 84(6):855-63.BJ

Abstract

This study was performed to examine the postprandial effects of meals containing dietary fats, with their natural fatty acid composition and tocopherol content, on the plasma triacylglycerols (TG) and tocopherols and on the resistance of VLDL and LDL to oxidation. On six separate days eighteen healthy male subjects were given low-fat meals (LF) or the LF meals enriched with sunflower oil (SO), rapeseed oil (RO), olive oil (OO), palm oil (PO), or butter (B) in a crossover design. The fat-rich meals all resulted in similar postprandial TG responses while the LF test meal did not increase plasma TG level. The postprandial plasma fatty acid profile changed to resemble the fatty acid composition of the ingested test fat. The alpha-tocopherol:gamma-tocopherol ratios in postprandial plasma and VLDL samples were greater than in the test fats. We found that the resistance of VLDL particles to oxidation in the postprandial state as assessed from lag time was increased after the PO-rich meal as compared with the SO-rich meal (p = 0.018), and the propagation rate was greater after the SO- and RO-rich meals compared with the others (p < 0.001). The resistance of LDL particles to oxidation was unaffected by the meals. In postprandial VLDL samples, the content of alpha-tocopherol was greater after the OO- and SO-rich meals compared with the meal rich in PO (P = 0.034 and 0.042 respectively). The gamma-tocopherol content of VLDL was highest after RO-meal as compared with all other test meals (P = 0.0019), and higher after SO as compared with B (P = 0.0148). Large individual differences were noted. In conclusion, meals enriched with different fats lead to the formation of VLDL particles with varying resistance to oxidation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition and Centre for Advanced Food Studies, The Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark. ninas@mimer.be.dtu.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11177202

Citation

Nielsen, N S., et al. "Effect of Meal Fat Quality On Oxidation Resistance of Postprandial VLDL and LDL Particles and Plasma Triacylglycerol Level." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 84, no. 6, 2000, pp. 855-63.
Nielsen NS, Marckmann P, Høy C. Effect of meal fat quality on oxidation resistance of postprandial VLDL and LDL particles and plasma triacylglycerol level. Br J Nutr. 2000;84(6):855-63.
Nielsen, N. S., Marckmann, P., & Høy, C. (2000). Effect of meal fat quality on oxidation resistance of postprandial VLDL and LDL particles and plasma triacylglycerol level. The British Journal of Nutrition, 84(6), 855-63.
Nielsen NS, Marckmann P, Høy C. Effect of Meal Fat Quality On Oxidation Resistance of Postprandial VLDL and LDL Particles and Plasma Triacylglycerol Level. Br J Nutr. 2000;84(6):855-63. PubMed PMID: 11177202.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of meal fat quality on oxidation resistance of postprandial VLDL and LDL particles and plasma triacylglycerol level. AU - Nielsen,N S, AU - Marckmann,P, AU - Høy,C, PY - 2001/2/15/pubmed PY - 2001/3/7/medline PY - 2001/2/15/entrez SP - 855 EP - 63 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 84 IS - 6 N2 - This study was performed to examine the postprandial effects of meals containing dietary fats, with their natural fatty acid composition and tocopherol content, on the plasma triacylglycerols (TG) and tocopherols and on the resistance of VLDL and LDL to oxidation. On six separate days eighteen healthy male subjects were given low-fat meals (LF) or the LF meals enriched with sunflower oil (SO), rapeseed oil (RO), olive oil (OO), palm oil (PO), or butter (B) in a crossover design. The fat-rich meals all resulted in similar postprandial TG responses while the LF test meal did not increase plasma TG level. The postprandial plasma fatty acid profile changed to resemble the fatty acid composition of the ingested test fat. The alpha-tocopherol:gamma-tocopherol ratios in postprandial plasma and VLDL samples were greater than in the test fats. We found that the resistance of VLDL particles to oxidation in the postprandial state as assessed from lag time was increased after the PO-rich meal as compared with the SO-rich meal (p = 0.018), and the propagation rate was greater after the SO- and RO-rich meals compared with the others (p < 0.001). The resistance of LDL particles to oxidation was unaffected by the meals. In postprandial VLDL samples, the content of alpha-tocopherol was greater after the OO- and SO-rich meals compared with the meal rich in PO (P = 0.034 and 0.042 respectively). The gamma-tocopherol content of VLDL was highest after RO-meal as compared with all other test meals (P = 0.0019), and higher after SO as compared with B (P = 0.0148). Large individual differences were noted. In conclusion, meals enriched with different fats lead to the formation of VLDL particles with varying resistance to oxidation. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11177202/Effect_of_meal_fat_quality_on_oxidation_resistance_of_postprandial_VLDL_and_LDL_particles_and_plasma_triacylglycerol_level_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114500002476/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -