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The lack of the bronchoprotective and not the bronchodilatory ability of deep inspiration is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001 Feb; 163(2):413-9.AJ

Abstract

In healthy subjects, deep inspiration (DI) acts both as a bronchodilator and a bronchoprotector. The latter is impaired in asthmatics. We have now evaluated whether the lack of bronchoprotection is related to bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and whether the bronchodilatory effect is also lost in asthmatics. Ten healthy subjects (PC20 > 75 mg/ml), 12 asthmatics with moderate to severe BHR (PC20 < 1 mg/ml), 14 asthmatics with mild to borderline BHR (1 < PC20 < 25 mg/ml), and 10 rhinitics with mild to borderline BHR (1 < PC20 < 25 mg/ml) underwent single-dose methacholine provocations inducing at least 20% reduction in FEV1 after 20 min of DI inhibition. To measure the bronchodilatory effect, DIs were taken immediately after the postmethacholine spirometry, and lung function was again tested. To measure the bronchoprotective effect, DIs were taken before the administration of spasmogen. All four groups achieved the same reductions in FEV1 and FVC, in the absence of deep breaths (analysis of variance [ANOVA], p = 0.49). Only healthy subjects showed bronchoprotection (percent bronchoprotection, mean +/- SEM; healthy: 79 +/- 4.0; asthmatics with moderate to severe BHR: 12 +/- 14.5; asthmatics with mild to borderline BHR: -7 +/- 19.7; rhinitics with mild to borderline BHR: 2 +/- 14.0). In contrast, DIs were able to partially reverse bronchial obstruction in all four groups, albeit percent bronchodilation in healthy subjects was somewhat stronger. The dissociation between bronchoprotection and bronchodilation suggests that the two effects involve different mechanisms.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland, USA. nicola@welch.jhu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11179115

Citation

Scichilone, N, et al. "The Lack of the Bronchoprotective and Not the Bronchodilatory Ability of Deep Inspiration Is Associated With Airway Hyperresponsiveness." American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, vol. 163, no. 2, 2001, pp. 413-9.
Scichilone N, Permutt S, Togias A. The lack of the bronchoprotective and not the bronchodilatory ability of deep inspiration is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001;163(2):413-9.
Scichilone, N., Permutt, S., & Togias, A. (2001). The lack of the bronchoprotective and not the bronchodilatory ability of deep inspiration is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, 163(2), 413-9.
Scichilone N, Permutt S, Togias A. The Lack of the Bronchoprotective and Not the Bronchodilatory Ability of Deep Inspiration Is Associated With Airway Hyperresponsiveness. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2001;163(2):413-9. PubMed PMID: 11179115.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The lack of the bronchoprotective and not the bronchodilatory ability of deep inspiration is associated with airway hyperresponsiveness. AU - Scichilone,N, AU - Permutt,S, AU - Togias,A, PY - 2001/2/17/pubmed PY - 2001/4/3/medline PY - 2001/2/17/entrez SP - 413 EP - 9 JF - American journal of respiratory and critical care medicine JO - Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med. VL - 163 IS - 2 N2 - In healthy subjects, deep inspiration (DI) acts both as a bronchodilator and a bronchoprotector. The latter is impaired in asthmatics. We have now evaluated whether the lack of bronchoprotection is related to bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), and whether the bronchodilatory effect is also lost in asthmatics. Ten healthy subjects (PC20 > 75 mg/ml), 12 asthmatics with moderate to severe BHR (PC20 < 1 mg/ml), 14 asthmatics with mild to borderline BHR (1 < PC20 < 25 mg/ml), and 10 rhinitics with mild to borderline BHR (1 < PC20 < 25 mg/ml) underwent single-dose methacholine provocations inducing at least 20% reduction in FEV1 after 20 min of DI inhibition. To measure the bronchodilatory effect, DIs were taken immediately after the postmethacholine spirometry, and lung function was again tested. To measure the bronchoprotective effect, DIs were taken before the administration of spasmogen. All four groups achieved the same reductions in FEV1 and FVC, in the absence of deep breaths (analysis of variance [ANOVA], p = 0.49). Only healthy subjects showed bronchoprotection (percent bronchoprotection, mean +/- SEM; healthy: 79 +/- 4.0; asthmatics with moderate to severe BHR: 12 +/- 14.5; asthmatics with mild to borderline BHR: -7 +/- 19.7; rhinitics with mild to borderline BHR: 2 +/- 14.0). In contrast, DIs were able to partially reverse bronchial obstruction in all four groups, albeit percent bronchodilation in healthy subjects was somewhat stronger. The dissociation between bronchoprotection and bronchodilation suggests that the two effects involve different mechanisms. SN - 1073-449X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11179115/The_lack_of_the_bronchoprotective_and_not_the_bronchodilatory_ability_of_deep_inspiration_is_associated_with_airway_hyperresponsiveness_ L2 - http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/ajrccm.163.2.2003119?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -