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Feasibility of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) against human immunodeficiency virus infection after sexual or injection drug use exposure: the San Francisco PEP Study.
J Infect Dis. 2001 Mar 01; 183(5):707-14.JI

Abstract

The feasibility of providing postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after sexual or injection drug use exposures to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was evaluated. PEP was provided within 72 h to individuals with exposures from partners known to have or to be at risk for HIV infection. PEP consisted of 4 weeks of antiretroviral medications and individually tailored risk-reduction and medication-adherence counseling. Among 401 participants seeking PEP, sexual exposures were most common (94%; n=375). Among sexual exposures, receptive (40%) and insertive (27%) anal intercourse were the most common sexual acts. The median time from exposure to treatment was 33 h. Ninety-seven percent of participants were treated exclusively with dual reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and 78% completed the 4-week treatment. Six months after the exposure, no participant developed HIV antibodies, although a second PEP course for a subsequent exposure was provided to 12%. PEP, after nonoccupational HIV exposure, is feasible for persons at risk for HIV infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Positive Health Program, Dept. of Medicine, University of California-San Francisco, at San Francisco General Hospital, 995 Potrero Ave., San Francisco, CA 94110, USA. jkahn@php.ucsf.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11181146

Citation

Kahn, J O., et al. "Feasibility of Postexposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection After Sexual or Injection Drug Use Exposure: the San Francisco PEP Study." The Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 183, no. 5, 2001, pp. 707-14.
Kahn JO, Martin JN, Roland ME, et al. Feasibility of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) against human immunodeficiency virus infection after sexual or injection drug use exposure: the San Francisco PEP Study. J Infect Dis. 2001;183(5):707-14.
Kahn, J. O., Martin, J. N., Roland, M. E., Bamberger, J. D., Chesney, M., Chambers, D., Franses, K., Coates, T. J., & Katz, M. H. (2001). Feasibility of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) against human immunodeficiency virus infection after sexual or injection drug use exposure: the San Francisco PEP Study. The Journal of Infectious Diseases, 183(5), 707-14.
Kahn JO, et al. Feasibility of Postexposure Prophylaxis (PEP) Against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection After Sexual or Injection Drug Use Exposure: the San Francisco PEP Study. J Infect Dis. 2001 Mar 1;183(5):707-14. PubMed PMID: 11181146.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feasibility of postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) against human immunodeficiency virus infection after sexual or injection drug use exposure: the San Francisco PEP Study. AU - Kahn,J O, AU - Martin,J N, AU - Roland,M E, AU - Bamberger,J D, AU - Chesney,M, AU - Chambers,D, AU - Franses,K, AU - Coates,T J, AU - Katz,M H, Y1 - 2001/02/01/ PY - 2000/08/25/received PY - 2000/11/17/revised PY - 2001/2/22/pubmed PY - 2001/4/3/medline PY - 2001/2/22/entrez SP - 707 EP - 14 JF - The Journal of infectious diseases JO - J Infect Dis VL - 183 IS - 5 N2 - The feasibility of providing postexposure prophylaxis (PEP) after sexual or injection drug use exposures to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was evaluated. PEP was provided within 72 h to individuals with exposures from partners known to have or to be at risk for HIV infection. PEP consisted of 4 weeks of antiretroviral medications and individually tailored risk-reduction and medication-adherence counseling. Among 401 participants seeking PEP, sexual exposures were most common (94%; n=375). Among sexual exposures, receptive (40%) and insertive (27%) anal intercourse were the most common sexual acts. The median time from exposure to treatment was 33 h. Ninety-seven percent of participants were treated exclusively with dual reverse-transcriptase inhibitors, and 78% completed the 4-week treatment. Six months after the exposure, no participant developed HIV antibodies, although a second PEP course for a subsequent exposure was provided to 12%. PEP, after nonoccupational HIV exposure, is feasible for persons at risk for HIV infection. SN - 0022-1899 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11181146/Feasibility_of_postexposure_prophylaxis__PEP__against_human_immunodeficiency_virus_infection_after_sexual_or_injection_drug_use_exposure:_the_San_Francisco_PEP_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jid/article-lookup/doi/10.1086/318829 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -