Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Promoter polymorphisms of hepatic lipase gene influence HDL(2) but not HDL(3) in African American men: CARDIA study.
J Lipid Res. 2001 Feb; 42(2):258-64.JL

Abstract

Hepatic lipase encoded by the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) is involved in the metabolism of several lipoproteins. Four promoter polymorphisms in LIPC have been found to be in complete disequilibrium and associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo)A-I levels in both white and black populations. We investigated the association between the promoter polymorphism and lipid profiles as well as anthropometric phenotypes in African American men in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study. We performed serial cross-sectional analyses and longitudinal analyses of lipids from 578 subjects in five examinations over 10 years of follow-up. Results showed that the allele frequency (0.52) in our black population was consistent with that reported in black subjects but much higher than that reported (approximately 0.2) in white populations. Analysis of covariance tests of the three genotypic means in each examination showed that the P values ranged from 0.01 to 0.08 for HDL-C (except P = 0.54 in the fourth examination), from 0.006 to 0.01 for HDL(2)-C, and from 0.06 to 0.07 for apoA-I. Mean HDL(3)-C levels were essentially identical among the three genotypes. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, and apoB, which are mainly involved in the very low density lipoprotein-LDL pathway, were not significantly different according to the promoter polymorphism, except for triglycerides in the third examination (P = 0.01). No significant association was found between anthropometric phenotypes and the LIPC polymorphism in any of five examinations. The change of the anthropometric variables was not significantly associated with genotypes. In conclusion, our results indicated that the LIPC promoter polymorphism has exclusive effects on HDL(2)-C but not HDL(3)-C levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia Genome Center, Columbia University, New York, NY 10032, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11181756

Citation

Juo, S H., et al. "Promoter Polymorphisms of Hepatic Lipase Gene Influence HDL(2) but Not HDL(3) in African American Men: CARDIA Study." Journal of Lipid Research, vol. 42, no. 2, 2001, pp. 258-64.
Juo SH, Han Z, Smith JD, et al. Promoter polymorphisms of hepatic lipase gene influence HDL(2) but not HDL(3) in African American men: CARDIA study. J Lipid Res. 2001;42(2):258-64.
Juo, S. H., Han, Z., Smith, J. D., Colangelo, L., & Liu, K. (2001). Promoter polymorphisms of hepatic lipase gene influence HDL(2) but not HDL(3) in African American men: CARDIA study. Journal of Lipid Research, 42(2), 258-64.
Juo SH, et al. Promoter Polymorphisms of Hepatic Lipase Gene Influence HDL(2) but Not HDL(3) in African American Men: CARDIA Study. J Lipid Res. 2001;42(2):258-64. PubMed PMID: 11181756.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Promoter polymorphisms of hepatic lipase gene influence HDL(2) but not HDL(3) in African American men: CARDIA study. AU - Juo,S H, AU - Han,Z, AU - Smith,J D, AU - Colangelo,L, AU - Liu,K, PY - 2001/2/22/pubmed PY - 2001/5/18/medline PY - 2001/2/22/entrez SP - 258 EP - 64 JF - Journal of lipid research JO - J Lipid Res VL - 42 IS - 2 N2 - Hepatic lipase encoded by the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) is involved in the metabolism of several lipoproteins. Four promoter polymorphisms in LIPC have been found to be in complete disequilibrium and associated with high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and apolipoprotein (apo)A-I levels in both white and black populations. We investigated the association between the promoter polymorphism and lipid profiles as well as anthropometric phenotypes in African American men in the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults study. We performed serial cross-sectional analyses and longitudinal analyses of lipids from 578 subjects in five examinations over 10 years of follow-up. Results showed that the allele frequency (0.52) in our black population was consistent with that reported in black subjects but much higher than that reported (approximately 0.2) in white populations. Analysis of covariance tests of the three genotypic means in each examination showed that the P values ranged from 0.01 to 0.08 for HDL-C (except P = 0.54 in the fourth examination), from 0.006 to 0.01 for HDL(2)-C, and from 0.06 to 0.07 for apoA-I. Mean HDL(3)-C levels were essentially identical among the three genotypes. Total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides, and apoB, which are mainly involved in the very low density lipoprotein-LDL pathway, were not significantly different according to the promoter polymorphism, except for triglycerides in the third examination (P = 0.01). No significant association was found between anthropometric phenotypes and the LIPC polymorphism in any of five examinations. The change of the anthropometric variables was not significantly associated with genotypes. In conclusion, our results indicated that the LIPC promoter polymorphism has exclusive effects on HDL(2)-C but not HDL(3)-C levels. SN - 0022-2275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11181756/Promoter_polymorphisms_of_hepatic_lipase_gene_influence_HDL_2__but_not_HDL_3__in_African_American_men:_CARDIA_study_ L2 - http://www.jlr.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11181756 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -