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Breast-feeding education and support: association with the decision to breast-feed.
Eff Clin Pract. 2000 May-Jun; 3(3):116-22.EC

Abstract

CONTEXT

Rates of breast-feeding in the United States are well below the Healthy People 2000 objective of 75% and do not meet recent American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines.

OBJECTIVE

To identify factors associated with the initiation and duration of breast-feeding in managed care enrollees who had had a normal vaginal delivery.

DESIGN

Telephone survey of 5213 new mothers (4 to 6 months postpartum) enrolled in commercial managed care plans (response rate 72%).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Starting breast-feeding (ever vs never) and duration of breast-feeding (< or = 6 weeks vs > 6 weeks).

ANALYSIS

Logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic variables. Given the prevalence of the outcome, odds ratios were converted to relative risks (RRs).

RESULTS

Seventy-five percent of respondents reported ever breast-feeding, and of those women, 75% reported breast-feeding for more than 6 weeks. In adjusted multivariate analyses, breast-feeding was affected by education, employment, and marital status. Women who were more likely to breast-feed were those who attended childbirth classes (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.20), those who received prenatal breast-feeding advice (RR, 1.24; CI, 1.19 to 1.27), and those who received postpartum breast-feeding assistance (RR, 1.31; CI, 1.15 to 1.34). Breast-feeding for more than 6 weeks postpartum was associated with education, employment status, and the adequacy of postpartum information.

CONCLUSIONS

These findings suggest that health plans and employees may promote breast-feeding by providing breast-feeding education and support.

Authors+Show Affiliations

U.S. Quality Algorithms Center for Health Care, Atlanta, Ga., USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11182959

Citation

Deshpande, A D., and J A. Gazmararian. "Breast-feeding Education and Support: Association With the Decision to Breast-feed." Effective Clinical Practice : ECP, vol. 3, no. 3, 2000, pp. 116-22.
Deshpande AD, Gazmararian JA. Breast-feeding education and support: association with the decision to breast-feed. Eff Clin Pract. 2000;3(3):116-22.
Deshpande, A. D., & Gazmararian, J. A. (2000). Breast-feeding education and support: association with the decision to breast-feed. Effective Clinical Practice : ECP, 3(3), 116-22.
Deshpande AD, Gazmararian JA. Breast-feeding Education and Support: Association With the Decision to Breast-feed. Eff Clin Pract. 2000 May-Jun;3(3):116-22. PubMed PMID: 11182959.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Breast-feeding education and support: association with the decision to breast-feed. AU - Deshpande,A D, AU - Gazmararian,J A, PY - 2001/2/24/pubmed PY - 2001/2/28/medline PY - 2001/2/24/entrez SP - 116 EP - 22 JF - Effective clinical practice : ECP JO - Eff Clin Pract VL - 3 IS - 3 N2 - CONTEXT: Rates of breast-feeding in the United States are well below the Healthy People 2000 objective of 75% and do not meet recent American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. OBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with the initiation and duration of breast-feeding in managed care enrollees who had had a normal vaginal delivery. DESIGN: Telephone survey of 5213 new mothers (4 to 6 months postpartum) enrolled in commercial managed care plans (response rate 72%). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Starting breast-feeding (ever vs never) and duration of breast-feeding (< or = 6 weeks vs > 6 weeks). ANALYSIS: Logistic regression models controlling for sociodemographic variables. Given the prevalence of the outcome, odds ratios were converted to relative risks (RRs). RESULTS: Seventy-five percent of respondents reported ever breast-feeding, and of those women, 75% reported breast-feeding for more than 6 weeks. In adjusted multivariate analyses, breast-feeding was affected by education, employment, and marital status. Women who were more likely to breast-feed were those who attended childbirth classes (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.20), those who received prenatal breast-feeding advice (RR, 1.24; CI, 1.19 to 1.27), and those who received postpartum breast-feeding assistance (RR, 1.31; CI, 1.15 to 1.34). Breast-feeding for more than 6 weeks postpartum was associated with education, employment status, and the adequacy of postpartum information. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that health plans and employees may promote breast-feeding by providing breast-feeding education and support. SN - 1099-8128 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11182959/Breast_feeding_education_and_support:_association_with_the_decision_to_breast_feed_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/breastfeeding.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -