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Bronchiolitis obliterans in children: clinical profile and diagnosis.
Respirology 2000; 5(4):369-75R

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The aim of the study was to determine the clinical profile, aetiology and radiological categories in children diagnosed with bronchiolitis obliterans (BO).

METHODOLOGY

We undertook a review of the medical records and radiological studies of 14 children with BO.

RESULTS

Unresolving cough and wheeze after a short respiratory illness was the commonest presentation. A viral pneumonitis was identified as the initial respiratory event prior to the development of BO in six children and Mycoplasma pneumoniae was the cause in another three children. Chest X-ray findings could be divided into four distinct patterns that were hyperinflation (n=5), mixed pattern of atelectasis, hyperlucency and bronchial thickening (n=4), unilateral small hyperlucent lung (n=3) and unilateral collapse of one lung (n=2). High resolution computed tomogram (HRCT) chest showing areas of hyperaeration and mosaic ground glass patterns with bronchial thickening were commonly found in patients whose chest X-ray showed bilateral changes. Patients with bilateral lung changes were more likely to have failure to thrive and persistent respiratory symptoms on follow up.

CONCLUSION

A diagnosis of BO can be made from typical clinical features combined with an understanding of the different chest X-ray categories and HRCT of the chest. A viral aetiology was the commonest cause for BO in our series.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, University Malaya Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. patrick@medicine.med.um.edu.myNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11192548

Citation

Chan, P W., et al. "Bronchiolitis Obliterans in Children: Clinical Profile and Diagnosis." Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), vol. 5, no. 4, 2000, pp. 369-75.
Chan PW, Muridan R, Debruyne JA. Bronchiolitis obliterans in children: clinical profile and diagnosis. Respirology. 2000;5(4):369-75.
Chan, P. W., Muridan, R., & Debruyne, J. A. (2000). Bronchiolitis obliterans in children: clinical profile and diagnosis. Respirology (Carlton, Vic.), 5(4), pp. 369-75.
Chan PW, Muridan R, Debruyne JA. Bronchiolitis Obliterans in Children: Clinical Profile and Diagnosis. Respirology. 2000;5(4):369-75. PubMed PMID: 11192548.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Bronchiolitis obliterans in children: clinical profile and diagnosis. AU - Chan,P W, AU - Muridan,R, AU - Debruyne,J A, PY - 2001/2/24/pubmed PY - 2001/3/17/medline PY - 2001/2/24/entrez SP - 369 EP - 75 JF - Respirology (Carlton, Vic.) JO - Respirology VL - 5 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to determine the clinical profile, aetiology and radiological categories in children diagnosed with bronchiolitis obliterans (BO). METHODOLOGY: We undertook a review of the medical records and radiological studies of 14 children with BO. RESULTS: Unresolving cough and wheeze after a short respiratory illness was the commonest presentation. A viral pneumonitis was identified as the initial respiratory event prior to the development of BO in six children and Mycoplasma pneumoniae was the cause in another three children. Chest X-ray findings could be divided into four distinct patterns that were hyperinflation (n=5), mixed pattern of atelectasis, hyperlucency and bronchial thickening (n=4), unilateral small hyperlucent lung (n=3) and unilateral collapse of one lung (n=2). High resolution computed tomogram (HRCT) chest showing areas of hyperaeration and mosaic ground glass patterns with bronchial thickening were commonly found in patients whose chest X-ray showed bilateral changes. Patients with bilateral lung changes were more likely to have failure to thrive and persistent respiratory symptoms on follow up. CONCLUSION: A diagnosis of BO can be made from typical clinical features combined with an understanding of the different chest X-ray categories and HRCT of the chest. A viral aetiology was the commonest cause for BO in our series. SN - 1323-7799 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11192548/Bronchiolitis_obliterans_in_children:_clinical_profile_and_diagnosis_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=1323-7799&date=2000&volume=5&issue=4&spage=369 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -