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Repair strength of etched vs silica-coated metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations.
Oper Dent. 2000 May-Jun; 25(3):209-15.OD

Abstract

The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine shear bond strengths of composite resin to metal-exposed porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) and all-ceramic restorations after silica coating or etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF). Specimens were fabricated for each of the following groups: two all-ceramic materials [a feldspathic porcelain (Vita Mark II) and a leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress)], and one noble metal-ceramic (Orplid Keramik I alloy; Vita VMK 68 N felspathic veneer ceramic). These groups were repaired with resin composites after different pretreatment methods. In one metal-ceramic subgroup the surface exhibited a 50% metal and 50% ceramic exposure. In the silica-coating groups, the specimen surfaces were air abraded with silica acid-modified Al2O3 (CoJet Sand) and treated corresponding to the porcelain repair with resin composite. For control groups, the surfaces were etched with 5% HF for 60 seconds and treated in the same way as the silica-coated groups. After 24 hours of storage (distilled water, 37 degrees C) and an additional 24 hours of thermocycling (1150 x 5 degrees C/55 degrees C) the specimens were debonded using a shear bond strength test (n = 15). In all groups the silica coat repair achieved equal or significantly higher bond strengths than did the etching technique (p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). In the metal-exposed group, the mean bond strength increased from 7.3 MPa to 16.3 MPa following the silica-coat repair. Results indicated that silica coating represents a suitable treatment for the intraoral repair of the materials tested in the present study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Policlinic for Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11203818

Citation

Frankenberger, R, et al. "Repair Strength of Etched Vs Silica-coated Metal-ceramic and All-ceramic Restorations." Operative Dentistry, vol. 25, no. 3, 2000, pp. 209-15.
Frankenberger R, Krämer N, Sindel J. Repair strength of etched vs silica-coated metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations. Oper Dent. 2000;25(3):209-15.
Frankenberger, R., Krämer, N., & Sindel, J. (2000). Repair strength of etched vs silica-coated metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations. Operative Dentistry, 25(3), 209-15.
Frankenberger R, Krämer N, Sindel J. Repair Strength of Etched Vs Silica-coated Metal-ceramic and All-ceramic Restorations. Oper Dent. 2000 May-Jun;25(3):209-15. PubMed PMID: 11203818.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Repair strength of etched vs silica-coated metal-ceramic and all-ceramic restorations. AU - Frankenberger,R, AU - Krämer,N, AU - Sindel,J, PY - 2001/2/24/pubmed PY - 2001/4/21/medline PY - 2001/2/24/entrez SP - 209 EP - 15 JF - Operative dentistry JO - Oper Dent VL - 25 IS - 3 N2 - The purpose of this in vitro study was to examine shear bond strengths of composite resin to metal-exposed porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) and all-ceramic restorations after silica coating or etching with 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF). Specimens were fabricated for each of the following groups: two all-ceramic materials [a feldspathic porcelain (Vita Mark II) and a leucite-reinforced glass-ceramic (IPS Empress)], and one noble metal-ceramic (Orplid Keramik I alloy; Vita VMK 68 N felspathic veneer ceramic). These groups were repaired with resin composites after different pretreatment methods. In one metal-ceramic subgroup the surface exhibited a 50% metal and 50% ceramic exposure. In the silica-coating groups, the specimen surfaces were air abraded with silica acid-modified Al2O3 (CoJet Sand) and treated corresponding to the porcelain repair with resin composite. For control groups, the surfaces were etched with 5% HF for 60 seconds and treated in the same way as the silica-coated groups. After 24 hours of storage (distilled water, 37 degrees C) and an additional 24 hours of thermocycling (1150 x 5 degrees C/55 degrees C) the specimens were debonded using a shear bond strength test (n = 15). In all groups the silica coat repair achieved equal or significantly higher bond strengths than did the etching technique (p < 0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). In the metal-exposed group, the mean bond strength increased from 7.3 MPa to 16.3 MPa following the silica-coat repair. Results indicated that silica coating represents a suitable treatment for the intraoral repair of the materials tested in the present study. SN - 0361-7734 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11203818/Repair_strength_of_etched_vs_silica_coated_metal_ceramic_and_all_ceramic_restorations_ L2 - https://antibodies.cancer.gov/detail/CPTC-GZMA-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -