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The effect of tooth preparation on microleakage behavior.
Oper Dent 2000 Nov-Dec; 25(6):526-33OD

Abstract

Many factors contribute to the microleakage of a restoration. One of the more important is the method of cavity preparation. This study compared the microleakage behavior of composite restorations placed in cavities prepared by different techniques. It also compared and correlated the microleakage data produced by an electrochemical vs a staining technique. Class V cavities were prepared in 48 premolars by four techniques: (1) tungsten carbide bur in a high-speed handpiece followed by acid etching; (2) air abrasion (27 microns Al2O3) followed by acid etching; (3) air abrasion (50 microns Al2O3) and (4) air abrasion (27 microns Al2O3), with n = 12 in each group. All teeth were restored with Prime and Bond 2.1 and Tetric Flow, then thermocycled between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C for 5000 cycles with a one minute dwell at each temperature. After thermocycling, a PVC-covered Cu wire was inserted apically into the pulp chamber of each tooth and sealed into position. Leakage was continuously followed by a conductimetric method for 75 days. The teeth then were immersed in 50% AgNO3 for two hours, rinsed in distilled water for 60 seconds, then placed in a rapid photographic developer solution for two hours, followed by rinsing and sectioning for microscopic examination. Electrochemical data were examined by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests, while Kruskal-Wallis and Rank Sum Difference tests were used on the staining evaluations. Spearman's rho test was used to correlate the two test techniques. Electrochemical data for cavities prepared with a bur or air abrasion followed by acid etching prior to restoration showed significantly less (p < or = 0.05) microleakage (mean leakage currents of 1.89 & 1.57 microA, respectively) than teeth prepared with air abrasion alone (mean leakage currents of 3.60 & 3.40 microA, respectively). Rank sum AgNO3 staining data (196 & 242 vs 371 & 368) supported these findings. The correlation between the electrochemical and staining data was significant (p < or = 0.05) for all four groups of test specimens.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dentistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD 21201, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11203866

Citation

von Fraunhofer, J A., et al. "The Effect of Tooth Preparation On Microleakage Behavior." Operative Dentistry, vol. 25, no. 6, 2000, pp. 526-33.
von Fraunhofer JA, Adachi EI, Barnes DM, et al. The effect of tooth preparation on microleakage behavior. Oper Dent. 2000;25(6):526-33.
von Fraunhofer, J. A., Adachi, E. I., Barnes, D. M., & Romberg, E. (2000). The effect of tooth preparation on microleakage behavior. Operative Dentistry, 25(6), pp. 526-33.
von Fraunhofer JA, et al. The Effect of Tooth Preparation On Microleakage Behavior. Oper Dent. 2000;25(6):526-33. PubMed PMID: 11203866.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of tooth preparation on microleakage behavior. AU - von Fraunhofer,J A, AU - Adachi,E I, AU - Barnes,D M, AU - Romberg,E, PY - 2001/2/24/pubmed PY - 2001/4/17/medline PY - 2001/2/24/entrez SP - 526 EP - 33 JF - Operative dentistry JO - Oper Dent VL - 25 IS - 6 N2 - Many factors contribute to the microleakage of a restoration. One of the more important is the method of cavity preparation. This study compared the microleakage behavior of composite restorations placed in cavities prepared by different techniques. It also compared and correlated the microleakage data produced by an electrochemical vs a staining technique. Class V cavities were prepared in 48 premolars by four techniques: (1) tungsten carbide bur in a high-speed handpiece followed by acid etching; (2) air abrasion (27 microns Al2O3) followed by acid etching; (3) air abrasion (50 microns Al2O3) and (4) air abrasion (27 microns Al2O3), with n = 12 in each group. All teeth were restored with Prime and Bond 2.1 and Tetric Flow, then thermocycled between 5 degrees and 55 degrees C for 5000 cycles with a one minute dwell at each temperature. After thermocycling, a PVC-covered Cu wire was inserted apically into the pulp chamber of each tooth and sealed into position. Leakage was continuously followed by a conductimetric method for 75 days. The teeth then were immersed in 50% AgNO3 for two hours, rinsed in distilled water for 60 seconds, then placed in a rapid photographic developer solution for two hours, followed by rinsing and sectioning for microscopic examination. Electrochemical data were examined by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparison tests, while Kruskal-Wallis and Rank Sum Difference tests were used on the staining evaluations. Spearman's rho test was used to correlate the two test techniques. Electrochemical data for cavities prepared with a bur or air abrasion followed by acid etching prior to restoration showed significantly less (p < or = 0.05) microleakage (mean leakage currents of 1.89 & 1.57 microA, respectively) than teeth prepared with air abrasion alone (mean leakage currents of 3.60 & 3.40 microA, respectively). Rank sum AgNO3 staining data (196 & 242 vs 371 & 368) supported these findings. The correlation between the electrochemical and staining data was significant (p < or = 0.05) for all four groups of test specimens. SN - 0361-7734 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11203866/The_effect_of_tooth_preparation_on_microleakage_behavior_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -