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Placebo-effects contribute to differences in the acquisition of drug discrimination by humans: a retrospective analysis.
Behav Pharmacol. 1995 Mar; 6(2):187-194.BP

Abstract

Adult human volunteers (n = 50) were trained to discriminate triazolam (TRZ, 0.32mg/70kg, p.o.) from placebo. Based on a criterion that required greater than 80% capsule-appropriate responding during each of four test sessions, 19 subjects were designated non-discriminators (NDs) and 31 were designated discriminators (Ds). NDs and Ds did not differ significantly in age, weight, gender or previous drug use and generally reported similar effects following TRZ. NDs reported greater effects following placebo than Ds on several measures, including 'good', 'bad', 'high' and sedative drug effects, suggesting that NDs in this study were 'placebo reactors'. These results show that NDs and Ds of TRZ differed in self-reported responses and suggest a close relationship between acquisition of a drug discrimination and self-reported effects of drugs. Moreover, greater placebo effects may hinder acquisition of TRZ discrimination.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Psychiatry University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05401, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11224326

Citation

Kamien, J.B., et al. "Placebo-effects Contribute to Differences in the Acquisition of Drug Discrimination By Humans: a Retrospective Analysis." Behavioural Pharmacology, vol. 6, no. 2, 1995, pp. 187-194.
Kamien JB, Bickel WK, Oliveto AH, et al. Placebo-effects contribute to differences in the acquisition of drug discrimination by humans: a retrospective analysis. Behav Pharmacol. 1995;6(2):187-194.
Kamien, J. B., Bickel, W. K., Oliveto, A. H., Higgins, S. T., Hughes, J. R., Richards, A. T., & Badger, G. J. (1995). Placebo-effects contribute to differences in the acquisition of drug discrimination by humans: a retrospective analysis. Behavioural Pharmacology, 6(2), 187-194.
Kamien JB, et al. Placebo-effects Contribute to Differences in the Acquisition of Drug Discrimination By Humans: a Retrospective Analysis. Behav Pharmacol. 1995;6(2):187-194. PubMed PMID: 11224326.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Placebo-effects contribute to differences in the acquisition of drug discrimination by humans: a retrospective analysis. AU - Kamien,J.B., AU - Bickel,W.K., AU - Oliveto,A.H., AU - Higgins,S.T., AU - Hughes,J.R., AU - Richards,A.T., AU - Badger,G.J., PY - 1995/3/1/pubmed PY - 2001/2/27/medline PY - 1995/3/1/entrez SP - 187 EP - 194 JF - Behavioural pharmacology JO - Behav Pharmacol VL - 6 IS - 2 N2 - Adult human volunteers (n = 50) were trained to discriminate triazolam (TRZ, 0.32mg/70kg, p.o.) from placebo. Based on a criterion that required greater than 80% capsule-appropriate responding during each of four test sessions, 19 subjects were designated non-discriminators (NDs) and 31 were designated discriminators (Ds). NDs and Ds did not differ significantly in age, weight, gender or previous drug use and generally reported similar effects following TRZ. NDs reported greater effects following placebo than Ds on several measures, including 'good', 'bad', 'high' and sedative drug effects, suggesting that NDs in this study were 'placebo reactors'. These results show that NDs and Ds of TRZ differed in self-reported responses and suggest a close relationship between acquisition of a drug discrimination and self-reported effects of drugs. Moreover, greater placebo effects may hinder acquisition of TRZ discrimination. SN - 1473-5849 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11224326/Placebo_effects_contribute_to_differences_in_the_acquisition_of_drug_discrimination_by_humans:_a_retrospective_analysis_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=11224326.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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