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Grasping visual illusions: no evidence for a dissociation between perception and action.
Psychol Sci. 2000 Jan; 11(1):20-5.PS

Abstract

Neuropsychological studies prompted the theory that the primate visual system might be organized into two parallel pathways, one for conscious perception and one for guiding action. Supporting evidence in healthy subjects seemed to come from a dissociation in visual illusions: In previous studies, the Ebbinghaus (or Titchener) illusion deceived perceptual judgments of size, but only marginally influenced the size estimates used in grasping. Contrary to those results, the findings from the present study show that there is no difference in the sizes of the perceptual and grasp illusions if the perceptual and grasping tasks are appropriately matched. We show that the differences found previously can be accounted for by a hitherto unknown, nonadditive effect in the illusion. We conclude that the illusion does not provide evidence for the existence of two distinct pathways for perception and action in the visual system.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Max-Planck-Institut für Biologische Kybernetik, Spemannstr. 38, D-72076 Tübingen, Germany. volker.franz@tuebingen.mpg.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11228838

Citation

Franz, V H., et al. "Grasping Visual Illusions: No Evidence for a Dissociation Between Perception and Action." Psychological Science, vol. 11, no. 1, 2000, pp. 20-5.
Franz VH, Gegenfurtner KR, Bülthoff HH, et al. Grasping visual illusions: no evidence for a dissociation between perception and action. Psychol Sci. 2000;11(1):20-5.
Franz, V. H., Gegenfurtner, K. R., Bülthoff, H. H., & Fahle, M. (2000). Grasping visual illusions: no evidence for a dissociation between perception and action. Psychological Science, 11(1), 20-5.
Franz VH, et al. Grasping Visual Illusions: No Evidence for a Dissociation Between Perception and Action. Psychol Sci. 2000;11(1):20-5. PubMed PMID: 11228838.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Grasping visual illusions: no evidence for a dissociation between perception and action. AU - Franz,V H, AU - Gegenfurtner,K R, AU - Bülthoff,H H, AU - Fahle,M, PY - 2001/3/7/pubmed PY - 2001/3/17/medline PY - 2001/3/7/entrez SP - 20 EP - 5 JF - Psychological science JO - Psychol Sci VL - 11 IS - 1 N2 - Neuropsychological studies prompted the theory that the primate visual system might be organized into two parallel pathways, one for conscious perception and one for guiding action. Supporting evidence in healthy subjects seemed to come from a dissociation in visual illusions: In previous studies, the Ebbinghaus (or Titchener) illusion deceived perceptual judgments of size, but only marginally influenced the size estimates used in grasping. Contrary to those results, the findings from the present study show that there is no difference in the sizes of the perceptual and grasp illusions if the perceptual and grasping tasks are appropriately matched. We show that the differences found previously can be accounted for by a hitherto unknown, nonadditive effect in the illusion. We conclude that the illusion does not provide evidence for the existence of two distinct pathways for perception and action in the visual system. SN - 0956-7976 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11228838/Grasping_visual_illusions:_no_evidence_for_a_dissociation_between_perception_and_action_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9280.00209?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -