Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Factors affecting injury severity to rear-seated occupants in rural motor vehicle crashes.
Am J Emerg Med. 2001 Mar; 19(2):93-8.AJ

Abstract

Injury to rear-seat occupants (RSOs) has received little systematic study in the literature. Past studies have focused on patterns of injury presented to the emergency department, various aspects of restraint usage and injury, or specific populations of RSOs. This is the first systematic analysis of injury severity to RSOs. RSOs involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) sustain injuries of equal severity as do front-seated occupants (FSOs) involved in the same crash. The setting was a rural North Carolina emergency department where patients were evaluated at the sole hospital for the county. The design was a 2-year retrospective review of all MVCs with RSOs occurring in Pitt County North Carolina in calendar years 1988 and 1989. The Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test and Logistic Regression Analysis with Injury Severity Score (ISS) as the dependent variable were performed. Three hundred forty-six crashes involving 367 vehicles with RSOs and 1,273 occupants that sent 222 patients to the hospital. ISS was higher for unrestrained occupants (1.87 versus 0.51), occupants of vehicles driven by legally intoxicated drivers (4.04 versus 0.73), occupants between the ages of 30 and 59 years (1.06 versus 0.65) and FSOs (1.04 versus 0.85) (Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test P <.0002). Logistic regression analysis confirmed these findings with the exception of more severe injuries for the 30 to 59 age range and impact speed. The analysis failed in these 2 cases. Restraint usage offered the greatest protective effect (OR 0.37). Lesser protective effects were noted with rear seat occupancy (OR 0.43) and age < 13 years (OR 0.77). More severe injuries were predicted by driver intoxication (OR 2.5), and age > 60 years (OR 1.25). In our rural population, RSOs sustain less severe injuries than FSOs. Restraint usage and sober drivers provide a greater protective effect however. Seat location does not replace restraint usage or sobriety.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Emergency Medicine, Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University School of Medicine, Greenville, NC 27858, USA.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11239249

Citation

Brown, C K., and D M. Cline. "Factors Affecting Injury Severity to Rear-seated Occupants in Rural Motor Vehicle Crashes." The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol. 19, no. 2, 2001, pp. 93-8.
Brown CK, Cline DM. Factors affecting injury severity to rear-seated occupants in rural motor vehicle crashes. Am J Emerg Med. 2001;19(2):93-8.
Brown, C. K., & Cline, D. M. (2001). Factors affecting injury severity to rear-seated occupants in rural motor vehicle crashes. The American Journal of Emergency Medicine, 19(2), 93-8.
Brown CK, Cline DM. Factors Affecting Injury Severity to Rear-seated Occupants in Rural Motor Vehicle Crashes. Am J Emerg Med. 2001;19(2):93-8. PubMed PMID: 11239249.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors affecting injury severity to rear-seated occupants in rural motor vehicle crashes. AU - Brown,C K, AU - Cline,D M, PY - 2001/3/10/pubmed PY - 2001/4/6/medline PY - 2001/3/10/entrez SP - 93 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of emergency medicine JO - Am J Emerg Med VL - 19 IS - 2 N2 - Injury to rear-seat occupants (RSOs) has received little systematic study in the literature. Past studies have focused on patterns of injury presented to the emergency department, various aspects of restraint usage and injury, or specific populations of RSOs. This is the first systematic analysis of injury severity to RSOs. RSOs involved in motor vehicle crashes (MVCs) sustain injuries of equal severity as do front-seated occupants (FSOs) involved in the same crash. The setting was a rural North Carolina emergency department where patients were evaluated at the sole hospital for the county. The design was a 2-year retrospective review of all MVCs with RSOs occurring in Pitt County North Carolina in calendar years 1988 and 1989. The Wilcoxon Rank-Sum Test and Logistic Regression Analysis with Injury Severity Score (ISS) as the dependent variable were performed. Three hundred forty-six crashes involving 367 vehicles with RSOs and 1,273 occupants that sent 222 patients to the hospital. ISS was higher for unrestrained occupants (1.87 versus 0.51), occupants of vehicles driven by legally intoxicated drivers (4.04 versus 0.73), occupants between the ages of 30 and 59 years (1.06 versus 0.65) and FSOs (1.04 versus 0.85) (Wilcoxon Rank-Sum test P <.0002). Logistic regression analysis confirmed these findings with the exception of more severe injuries for the 30 to 59 age range and impact speed. The analysis failed in these 2 cases. Restraint usage offered the greatest protective effect (OR 0.37). Lesser protective effects were noted with rear seat occupancy (OR 0.43) and age < 13 years (OR 0.77). More severe injuries were predicted by driver intoxication (OR 2.5), and age > 60 years (OR 1.25). In our rural population, RSOs sustain less severe injuries than FSOs. Restraint usage and sober drivers provide a greater protective effect however. Seat location does not replace restraint usage or sobriety. SN - 0735-6757 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11239249/Factors_affecting_injury_severity_to_rear_seated_occupants_in_rural_motor_vehicle_crashes_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0735-6757(01)22443-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -