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A population-based study of the relationship between salt intake, bone resorption and bone mass.
Eur J Clin Nutr 1997; 51(8):561-5EJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To explore the relationship between urinary sodium (the best measure of salt intake), urinary calcium, urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPYR) and bone mass.

DESIGN

Cross-sectional study.

SETTING

Population based sample of healthy Hobart residents.

SUBJECTS

One hundred and fifty-four (M = 34, F = 120) subjects invited to take part from a systematic sample of the electoral roll and a single newspaper advertisement.

RESULTS

In both sexes, urinary sodium correlated moderately with urinary DPYR (r = 0.32, P < 0.0001) and urinary calcium (r = 0.37, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, the combination of urinary sodium, total body bone area, age and sex explained 22% of the variation in log-transformed DPYR (P < 0.00001). In univariate analysis, both urinary sodium and urinary DPYR were strongly associated with bone mineral content and bone mineral density at all sites but this association disappeared after adjustment for confounders particularly body weight.

CONCLUSIONS

This study has shown that salt intake is associated with markers of bone resorption in a population-based sample of males and females and appears likely to be a risk factor for osteoporosis despite the lack of a demonstrable association between bone mass and a single measure of urinary sodium excretion. Further studies are needed to define the effect of salt intake on bone mass and fractures more clearly. These studies will need to be either longitudinal or interventional in design with repeated measures of urinary sodium so that habitual sodium intake can be accurately assessed and regression dilution bias can be minimised.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Menzies Centre for Population Health Research, GPO Box 252-23, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11248883

Citation

Jones, G, et al. "A Population-based Study of the Relationship Between Salt Intake, Bone Resorption and Bone Mass." European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 51, no. 8, 1997, pp. 561-5.
Jones G, Beard T, Parameswaran V, et al. A population-based study of the relationship between salt intake, bone resorption and bone mass. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997;51(8):561-5.
Jones, G., Beard, T., Parameswaran, V., Greenaway, T., & von Witt, R. (1997). A population-based study of the relationship between salt intake, bone resorption and bone mass. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 51(8), pp. 561-5.
Jones G, et al. A Population-based Study of the Relationship Between Salt Intake, Bone Resorption and Bone Mass. Eur J Clin Nutr. 1997;51(8):561-5. PubMed PMID: 11248883.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A population-based study of the relationship between salt intake, bone resorption and bone mass. AU - Jones,G, AU - Beard,T, AU - Parameswaran,V, AU - Greenaway,T, AU - von Witt,R, PY - 1997/8/1/pubmed PY - 2001/6/22/medline PY - 1997/8/1/entrez SP - 561 EP - 5 JF - European journal of clinical nutrition JO - Eur J Clin Nutr VL - 51 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between urinary sodium (the best measure of salt intake), urinary calcium, urinary deoxypyridinoline (DPYR) and bone mass. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Population based sample of healthy Hobart residents. SUBJECTS: One hundred and fifty-four (M = 34, F = 120) subjects invited to take part from a systematic sample of the electoral roll and a single newspaper advertisement. RESULTS: In both sexes, urinary sodium correlated moderately with urinary DPYR (r = 0.32, P < 0.0001) and urinary calcium (r = 0.37, P < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, the combination of urinary sodium, total body bone area, age and sex explained 22% of the variation in log-transformed DPYR (P < 0.00001). In univariate analysis, both urinary sodium and urinary DPYR were strongly associated with bone mineral content and bone mineral density at all sites but this association disappeared after adjustment for confounders particularly body weight. CONCLUSIONS: This study has shown that salt intake is associated with markers of bone resorption in a population-based sample of males and females and appears likely to be a risk factor for osteoporosis despite the lack of a demonstrable association between bone mass and a single measure of urinary sodium excretion. Further studies are needed to define the effect of salt intake on bone mass and fractures more clearly. These studies will need to be either longitudinal or interventional in design with repeated measures of urinary sodium so that habitual sodium intake can be accurately assessed and regression dilution bias can be minimised. SN - 0954-3007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11248883/A_population_based_study_of_the_relationship_between_salt_intake_bone_resorption_and_bone_mass_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/bonedensity.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -