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V. Stress and irritable bowel syndrome.

Abstract

Different types of stress play important roles in the onset and modulation of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. The physiological effects of psychological and physical stressors on gut function and brain-gut interactions are mediated by outputs of the emotional motor system in terms of autonomic, neuroendocrine, attentional, and pain modulatory responses. IBS patients show an enhanced responsiveness of this system manifesting in altered modulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion and in alterations in the perception of visceral events. Functional brain imaging techniques are beginning to identify brain circuits involved in the perceptual alterations. Animal models have recently been proposed that mimic key features of the human syndrome.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    UCLA/CURE Neuroenteric Disease Program, Departments of Medicine, Physiology, and Biobehavioral Sciences, UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California 90024, USA. emayer@ucla.edu

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Animals
    Colonic Diseases, Functional
    Digestive System
    Humans
    Stress, Psychological

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11254476

    Citation

    Mayer, E A., et al. "V. Stress and Irritable Bowel Syndrome." American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, vol. 280, no. 4, 2001, pp. G519-24.
    Mayer EA, Naliboff BD, Chang L, et al. V. Stress and irritable bowel syndrome. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2001;280(4):G519-24.
    Mayer, E. A., Naliboff, B. D., Chang, L., & Coutinho, S. V. (2001). V. Stress and irritable bowel syndrome. American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, 280(4), pp. G519-24.
    Mayer EA, et al. V. Stress and Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2001;280(4):G519-24. PubMed PMID: 11254476.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - V. Stress and irritable bowel syndrome. AU - Mayer,E A, AU - Naliboff,B D, AU - Chang,L, AU - Coutinho,S V, PY - 2001/3/20/pubmed PY - 2001/4/21/medline PY - 2001/3/20/entrez SP - G519 EP - 24 JF - American journal of physiology. Gastrointestinal and liver physiology JO - Am. J. Physiol. Gastrointest. Liver Physiol. VL - 280 IS - 4 N2 - Different types of stress play important roles in the onset and modulation of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) symptoms. The physiological effects of psychological and physical stressors on gut function and brain-gut interactions are mediated by outputs of the emotional motor system in terms of autonomic, neuroendocrine, attentional, and pain modulatory responses. IBS patients show an enhanced responsiveness of this system manifesting in altered modulation of gastrointestinal motility and secretion and in alterations in the perception of visceral events. Functional brain imaging techniques are beginning to identify brain circuits involved in the perceptual alterations. Animal models have recently been proposed that mimic key features of the human syndrome. SN - 0193-1857 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11254476/full_citation L2 - http://www.physiology.org/doi/full/10.1152/ajpgi.2001.280.4.G519?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -