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Feasibility of a nurse-run asthma education program for urban African-Americans: a pilot study.
J Asthma. 2001 Feb; 38(1):23-32.JA

Abstract

The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a culturally appropriate in-patient asthma education program specifically targeted for African-Americans. A consecutive sample of 28 African-American patients ages 18-50 who were hospitalized for asthma were randomized to an intervention group, which received three one-on-one sessions on chronic asthma management, or a control group, which received the usual care. Data on symptom frequency, self-management behaviors, quality of life, depression, and health care resource use were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Although the time required to recruit our sample took longer than anticipated, 28 subjects agreed to be in the study (70% acceptance rate) and complete the baseline interview. We observed no statistically significant differences from baseline or changing trends in frequency of asthma symptoms, self-management behaviors, and health care resource use between the intervention and control groups at 3 and 6 months. However patients in the intervention group demonstrated a greater average increase in asthma-related quality of life and a greater average decrease in depression than the control group. Feasibility issues included shortened length of stay, which necessitated conducting all three self-management sessions together; multiple interruptions during the sessions, and retention issues at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The lessons learned from this pilot study are invaluable in that they will enable us to make changes in our existing protocol to ensure the success of a larger clinical trial.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, Ohio 44195, USA. blixenc@ccf.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11256551

Citation

Blixen, C E., et al. "Feasibility of a Nurse-run Asthma Education Program for Urban African-Americans: a Pilot Study." The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, vol. 38, no. 1, 2001, pp. 23-32.
Blixen CE, Hammel JP, Murphy D, et al. Feasibility of a nurse-run asthma education program for urban African-Americans: a pilot study. J Asthma. 2001;38(1):23-32.
Blixen, C. E., Hammel, J. P., Murphy, D., & Ault, V. (2001). Feasibility of a nurse-run asthma education program for urban African-Americans: a pilot study. The Journal of Asthma : Official Journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma, 38(1), 23-32.
Blixen CE, et al. Feasibility of a Nurse-run Asthma Education Program for Urban African-Americans: a Pilot Study. J Asthma. 2001;38(1):23-32. PubMed PMID: 11256551.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Feasibility of a nurse-run asthma education program for urban African-Americans: a pilot study. AU - Blixen,C E, AU - Hammel,J P, AU - Murphy,D, AU - Ault,V, PY - 2001/3/21/pubmed PY - 2001/5/26/medline PY - 2001/3/21/entrez SP - 23 EP - 32 JF - The Journal of asthma : official journal of the Association for the Care of Asthma JO - J Asthma VL - 38 IS - 1 N2 - The objective of the study was to assess the feasibility of implementing and evaluating a culturally appropriate in-patient asthma education program specifically targeted for African-Americans. A consecutive sample of 28 African-American patients ages 18-50 who were hospitalized for asthma were randomized to an intervention group, which received three one-on-one sessions on chronic asthma management, or a control group, which received the usual care. Data on symptom frequency, self-management behaviors, quality of life, depression, and health care resource use were collected at baseline and at 3 and 6 months. Although the time required to recruit our sample took longer than anticipated, 28 subjects agreed to be in the study (70% acceptance rate) and complete the baseline interview. We observed no statistically significant differences from baseline or changing trends in frequency of asthma symptoms, self-management behaviors, and health care resource use between the intervention and control groups at 3 and 6 months. However patients in the intervention group demonstrated a greater average increase in asthma-related quality of life and a greater average decrease in depression than the control group. Feasibility issues included shortened length of stay, which necessitated conducting all three self-management sessions together; multiple interruptions during the sessions, and retention issues at 3- and 6-month follow-ups. The lessons learned from this pilot study are invaluable in that they will enable us to make changes in our existing protocol to ensure the success of a larger clinical trial. SN - 0277-0903 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11256551/Feasibility_of_a_nurse_run_asthma_education_program_for_urban_African_Americans:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/633 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -