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Diets with either beef or plant proteins reduce risk of calcium oxalate precipitation in patients with a history of calcium kidney stones.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 Mar; 101(3):326-31.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine the effect of substituting equal amounts of dietary protein as animal protein (beef) for plant protein (legumes, seeds, nuts, and grains) on urinary components associated with calcium oxalate precipitability risk.

DESIGN

Randomized crossover trial.

SUBJECTS

Twenty-three normocalciuric patients with a history of calcium kidney stones (8 women and 15 men, mean age 50.7+/-14.6 years) with 24-hour urinary calcium < or =10.3 micromol, 24 hour urinary oxalate excretion between 228 and 963 micromol, and a urinary calcium increase of < or =1.0 micromol in 4 hours after a 25 micromol oral calcium load.

SETTING

Four-day, free-living adaptation period, followed by 2-day metabolic unit study.

INTERVENTION

The study compared consumption of 2 servings of beef (43 g protein for women and 50 g for men) daily with an equal amount of protein from plant foods including legumes, nuts, and grains.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Tiselius risk index (TRI) for calcium oxalate precipitability calculated from urinary calcium, oxalate, magnesium, citrate, and volume.

STATISTICAL ANALYSES

Paired t tests.

RESULTS

Urinary calcium, oxalate, magnesium, citrate, phosphorus, volume, and TRI did not differ between diets. Urinary sodium and potassium were higher for patients on the plant protein diet. After correcting for variations in urinary sodium and potassium between diets, the difference in urinary calcium remained insignificant. TRI was lower on both beef- and plant-protein diets compared with self-selected prestudy diets for all participants. CONCLUSION/APPLICATIONS: Balanced diets containing moderate amounts of either beef or plant protein are equally effective in reducing calcium oxalate kidney stone risk based on changes in urinary composition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Science and Human Nutrition, Washington State University, Spokane 99201-3899, USA. massey@wsu.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Comparative Study
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11269613

Citation

Massey, L K., and S A. Kynast-Gales. "Diets With Either Beef or Plant Proteins Reduce Risk of Calcium Oxalate Precipitation in Patients With a History of Calcium Kidney Stones." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 101, no. 3, 2001, pp. 326-31.
Massey LK, Kynast-Gales SA. Diets with either beef or plant proteins reduce risk of calcium oxalate precipitation in patients with a history of calcium kidney stones. J Am Diet Assoc. 2001;101(3):326-31.
Massey, L. K., & Kynast-Gales, S. A. (2001). Diets with either beef or plant proteins reduce risk of calcium oxalate precipitation in patients with a history of calcium kidney stones. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 101(3), 326-31.
Massey LK, Kynast-Gales SA. Diets With Either Beef or Plant Proteins Reduce Risk of Calcium Oxalate Precipitation in Patients With a History of Calcium Kidney Stones. J Am Diet Assoc. 2001;101(3):326-31. PubMed PMID: 11269613.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diets with either beef or plant proteins reduce risk of calcium oxalate precipitation in patients with a history of calcium kidney stones. AU - Massey,L K, AU - Kynast-Gales,S A, PY - 2001/3/28/pubmed PY - 2001/4/21/medline PY - 2001/3/28/entrez SP - 326 EP - 31 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 101 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of substituting equal amounts of dietary protein as animal protein (beef) for plant protein (legumes, seeds, nuts, and grains) on urinary components associated with calcium oxalate precipitability risk. DESIGN: Randomized crossover trial. SUBJECTS: Twenty-three normocalciuric patients with a history of calcium kidney stones (8 women and 15 men, mean age 50.7+/-14.6 years) with 24-hour urinary calcium < or =10.3 micromol, 24 hour urinary oxalate excretion between 228 and 963 micromol, and a urinary calcium increase of < or =1.0 micromol in 4 hours after a 25 micromol oral calcium load. SETTING: Four-day, free-living adaptation period, followed by 2-day metabolic unit study. INTERVENTION: The study compared consumption of 2 servings of beef (43 g protein for women and 50 g for men) daily with an equal amount of protein from plant foods including legumes, nuts, and grains. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Tiselius risk index (TRI) for calcium oxalate precipitability calculated from urinary calcium, oxalate, magnesium, citrate, and volume. STATISTICAL ANALYSES: Paired t tests. RESULTS: Urinary calcium, oxalate, magnesium, citrate, phosphorus, volume, and TRI did not differ between diets. Urinary sodium and potassium were higher for patients on the plant protein diet. After correcting for variations in urinary sodium and potassium between diets, the difference in urinary calcium remained insignificant. TRI was lower on both beef- and plant-protein diets compared with self-selected prestudy diets for all participants. CONCLUSION/APPLICATIONS: Balanced diets containing moderate amounts of either beef or plant protein are equally effective in reducing calcium oxalate kidney stone risk based on changes in urinary composition. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11269613/Diets_with_either_beef_or_plant_proteins_reduce_risk_of_calcium_oxalate_precipitation_in_patients_with_a_history_of_calcium_kidney_stones_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(01)00085-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -