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Diet, clothing, sunshine exposure and micronutrient status of Arab infants and young children.
Ann Trop Paediatr. 2001 Mar; 21(1):39-44.AT

Abstract

Vitamin C and D levels in Arab women and their newborn infants have been shown to be low. We investigated the prevalence of and risk factors for possible hypovitaminosis C and D in a convenience sample of 51 hospitalized children without clinical features of vitamin C or D deficiency. The mean age was 15.4 months. The serum vitamin C concentration was low in the mothers but normal in the children. Both mothers and children had low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentrations. Fifty per cent of the mothers and 22% of the infants and children had hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-OHD level < 25 nmol/l). Infants who received dietary vitamin D supplementation had a higher mean (SD) serum 25-OHD concentration than the unsupplemented group (62.5 (29.8) vs 38.5 (27.3), p = 001). Cutaneous light exposure in these children was poor. The children's serum 25-OHD concentration correlated with dietary vitamin D supplementation and maternal serum 25-OHD levels. The results suggest normal vitamin C status but a possible high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in Arab children and their mothers in UAE. Health education to encourage greater sunshine exposure and improvement in maternal vitamin D stores and the availability of adequate vitamin D supplements would improve children's vitamin D status. The study indicates that hypovitaminosis D continues to be an important maternal and child health problem, despite the abundant sunshine.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, FMHS, UAE University, Al Ain, United Arab Emirates. a.dawodu@uaeu.ac.aeNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11284245

Citation

Dawodu, A, et al. "Diet, Clothing, Sunshine Exposure and Micronutrient Status of Arab Infants and Young Children." Annals of Tropical Paediatrics, vol. 21, no. 1, 2001, pp. 39-44.
Dawodu A, Dawson KP, Amirlak I, et al. Diet, clothing, sunshine exposure and micronutrient status of Arab infants and young children. Ann Trop Paediatr. 2001;21(1):39-44.
Dawodu, A., Dawson, K. P., Amirlak, I., Kochiyil, J., Agarwal, M., & Badrinath, P. (2001). Diet, clothing, sunshine exposure and micronutrient status of Arab infants and young children. Annals of Tropical Paediatrics, 21(1), 39-44.
Dawodu A, et al. Diet, Clothing, Sunshine Exposure and Micronutrient Status of Arab Infants and Young Children. Ann Trop Paediatr. 2001;21(1):39-44. PubMed PMID: 11284245.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Diet, clothing, sunshine exposure and micronutrient status of Arab infants and young children. AU - Dawodu,A, AU - Dawson,K P, AU - Amirlak,I, AU - Kochiyil,J, AU - Agarwal,M, AU - Badrinath,P, PY - 2001/4/4/pubmed PY - 2001/4/17/medline PY - 2001/4/4/entrez SP - 39 EP - 44 JF - Annals of tropical paediatrics JO - Ann Trop Paediatr VL - 21 IS - 1 N2 - Vitamin C and D levels in Arab women and their newborn infants have been shown to be low. We investigated the prevalence of and risk factors for possible hypovitaminosis C and D in a convenience sample of 51 hospitalized children without clinical features of vitamin C or D deficiency. The mean age was 15.4 months. The serum vitamin C concentration was low in the mothers but normal in the children. Both mothers and children had low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentrations. Fifty per cent of the mothers and 22% of the infants and children had hypovitaminosis D (serum 25-OHD level < 25 nmol/l). Infants who received dietary vitamin D supplementation had a higher mean (SD) serum 25-OHD concentration than the unsupplemented group (62.5 (29.8) vs 38.5 (27.3), p = 001). Cutaneous light exposure in these children was poor. The children's serum 25-OHD concentration correlated with dietary vitamin D supplementation and maternal serum 25-OHD levels. The results suggest normal vitamin C status but a possible high prevalence of hypovitaminosis D in Arab children and their mothers in UAE. Health education to encourage greater sunshine exposure and improvement in maternal vitamin D stores and the availability of adequate vitamin D supplements would improve children's vitamin D status. The study indicates that hypovitaminosis D continues to be an important maternal and child health problem, despite the abundant sunshine. SN - 0272-4936 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11284245/Diet_clothing_sunshine_exposure_and_micronutrient_status_of_Arab_infants_and_young_children_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/vitaminc.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -