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The effect of alcohol consumption on periodontal disease.
J Periodontol. 2001 Feb; 72(2):183-9.JP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Alcohol consumption, like smoking, may be related to periodontal disease independently of oral hygiene status. This study assessed the relationship between alcohol consumption and severity of periodontal disease.

METHODS

A cross-sectional study of 1,371 subjects ages 25 to 74 in the Erie County, NY population was performed. Alcohol intake was assessed by means of previously validated self-reported questionnaires. Outcome variables were gingival bleeding, clinical attachment loss, alveolar bone loss, and presence of subgingival microorganisms.

RESULTS

Logistic regression analyses adjusting for age, gender, race, education, income, smoking, diabetes mellitus, dental plaque, and presence of any of 8 subgingival microorganisms showed that those consuming > or =5 drinks/week had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.65 (95% CI: 1.22 to 2.23) of having higher gingival bleeding, and OR of 1.36 (95% CI: 1.02 to 1.80) of having more severe clinical attachment loss compared to those consuming <5 drinks/week. Those consuming > or =10 drinks/week had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.62 (95% CI: 1.12 to 2.33) of having higher gingival bleeding and OR of 1.44 (95% CI: 1.04 to 2.00) of having more severe clinical attachment loss compared to those consuming <10 drinks/week. Alcohol consumption was not significantly related to alveolar bone loss nor to any of the subgingival microorganisms.

CONCLUSIONS

The results suggest that alcohol consumption is associated with moderately increased severity of periodontal disease. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether alcohol is a true risk factor for periodontal disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State University of New York at Buffalo, School of Dental Medicine, Department of Oral Biology, 14214-3092, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11288791

Citation

Tezal, M, et al. "The Effect of Alcohol Consumption On Periodontal Disease." Journal of Periodontology, vol. 72, no. 2, 2001, pp. 183-9.
Tezal M, Grossi SG, Ho AW, et al. The effect of alcohol consumption on periodontal disease. J Periodontol. 2001;72(2):183-9.
Tezal, M., Grossi, S. G., Ho, A. W., & Genco, R. J. (2001). The effect of alcohol consumption on periodontal disease. Journal of Periodontology, 72(2), 183-9.
Tezal M, et al. The Effect of Alcohol Consumption On Periodontal Disease. J Periodontol. 2001;72(2):183-9. PubMed PMID: 11288791.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The effect of alcohol consumption on periodontal disease. AU - Tezal,M, AU - Grossi,S G, AU - Ho,A W, AU - Genco,R J, PY - 2001/4/6/pubmed PY - 2001/5/22/medline PY - 2001/4/6/entrez SP - 183 EP - 9 JF - Journal of periodontology JO - J Periodontol VL - 72 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption, like smoking, may be related to periodontal disease independently of oral hygiene status. This study assessed the relationship between alcohol consumption and severity of periodontal disease. METHODS: A cross-sectional study of 1,371 subjects ages 25 to 74 in the Erie County, NY population was performed. Alcohol intake was assessed by means of previously validated self-reported questionnaires. Outcome variables were gingival bleeding, clinical attachment loss, alveolar bone loss, and presence of subgingival microorganisms. RESULTS: Logistic regression analyses adjusting for age, gender, race, education, income, smoking, diabetes mellitus, dental plaque, and presence of any of 8 subgingival microorganisms showed that those consuming > or =5 drinks/week had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.65 (95% CI: 1.22 to 2.23) of having higher gingival bleeding, and OR of 1.36 (95% CI: 1.02 to 1.80) of having more severe clinical attachment loss compared to those consuming <5 drinks/week. Those consuming > or =10 drinks/week had an odds ratio (OR) of 1.62 (95% CI: 1.12 to 2.33) of having higher gingival bleeding and OR of 1.44 (95% CI: 1.04 to 2.00) of having more severe clinical attachment loss compared to those consuming <10 drinks/week. Alcohol consumption was not significantly related to alveolar bone loss nor to any of the subgingival microorganisms. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that alcohol consumption is associated with moderately increased severity of periodontal disease. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether alcohol is a true risk factor for periodontal disease. SN - 0022-3492 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11288791/The_effect_of_alcohol_consumption_on_periodontal_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1902/jop.2001.72.2.183 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -