Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Misclassification of exposure: coffee as a surrogate for caffeine intake.

Abstract

This study was conducted to assess the effect of exposure misclassification when coffee is used as a surrogate measure of caffeine exposure. Subjects were randomly selected from the telephone directories of four regional municipalities in southern Ontario, CANADA: Data on daily caffeine intake from foods, beverages, and medications were collected from June to November 1995 through self-administered, mailed questionnaires from 481 men and women aged 30-75 years. Although coffee was the main source of caffeine, cross-tabulations of exposure to coffee by total caffeine intake showed that assessment of coffee alone severely underestimated caffeine intake by at least one exposure level. A hypothetical 10-fold increase in risk was completely obscured when only coffee was used to estimate total caffeine intake. The results of this study suggest that measuring coffee instead of caffeine intake may contribute to a lack of positive findings in studies of coffee as a risk factor for disease occurrence, if in fact caffeine is the exposure of interest. On the other hand, measurement of coffee, tea, and cola soft drink intake in the present study appeared to approximate caffeine intake sufficiently and not affect risk estimates adversely.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Division of Preventive Oncology, Cancer Care Ontario, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

    , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 153:8 2001 Apr 15 pg 815-20

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Caffeine
    Central Nervous System Stimulants
    Coffee
    Diet
    Environmental Exposure
    Epidemiologic Studies
    Female
    Health Surveys
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Reproducibility of Results
    Risk Factors
    Sensitivity and Specificity
    Surveys and Questionnaires

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11296156

    Citation

    Brown, J, et al. "Misclassification of Exposure: Coffee as a Surrogate for Caffeine Intake." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 153, no. 8, 2001, pp. 815-20.
    Brown J, Kreiger N, Darlington GA, et al. Misclassification of exposure: coffee as a surrogate for caffeine intake. Am J Epidemiol. 2001;153(8):815-20.
    Brown, J., Kreiger, N., Darlington, G. A., & Sloan, M. (2001). Misclassification of exposure: coffee as a surrogate for caffeine intake. American Journal of Epidemiology, 153(8), pp. 815-20.
    Brown J, et al. Misclassification of Exposure: Coffee as a Surrogate for Caffeine Intake. Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Apr 15;153(8):815-20. PubMed PMID: 11296156.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Misclassification of exposure: coffee as a surrogate for caffeine intake. AU - Brown,J, AU - Kreiger,N, AU - Darlington,G A, AU - Sloan,M, PY - 2001/4/11/pubmed PY - 2001/5/5/medline PY - 2001/4/11/entrez SP - 815 EP - 20 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 153 IS - 8 N2 - This study was conducted to assess the effect of exposure misclassification when coffee is used as a surrogate measure of caffeine exposure. Subjects were randomly selected from the telephone directories of four regional municipalities in southern Ontario, CANADA: Data on daily caffeine intake from foods, beverages, and medications were collected from June to November 1995 through self-administered, mailed questionnaires from 481 men and women aged 30-75 years. Although coffee was the main source of caffeine, cross-tabulations of exposure to coffee by total caffeine intake showed that assessment of coffee alone severely underestimated caffeine intake by at least one exposure level. A hypothetical 10-fold increase in risk was completely obscured when only coffee was used to estimate total caffeine intake. The results of this study suggest that measuring coffee instead of caffeine intake may contribute to a lack of positive findings in studies of coffee as a risk factor for disease occurrence, if in fact caffeine is the exposure of interest. On the other hand, measurement of coffee, tea, and cola soft drink intake in the present study appeared to approximate caffeine intake sufficiently and not affect risk estimates adversely. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11296156/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/153.8.815 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -