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Fiber intake, constipation, and risk of varicose veins in the general population: Edinburgh Vein Study.

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between fiber intake, constipation, and clinical venous disease in the general population. The Edinburgh Vein Study was comprised of 1566 men and women aged 18-64 years who were selected at random from the age-sex registers of 12 general practices. Fiber intake, intestinal transit time, defecation frequency and the prevalence of straining at stool were all found to be significantly different between the sexes. Men who reported that they strained to start passing a motion showed a higher prevalence of mild and severe trunk varices compared to men who did not strain. After adjustment for social class, BMI and mobility at work, this group of men showed a significantly elevated risk of having severe trunk varices (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.16, 6.58). In contrast, no consistent relationships were seen among women. Overall, within this Western general population, an association between dietary fiber, constipation and the presence or severity of varicose veins was not supported.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Wolfson Unit for Prevention of Peripheral Vascular Diseases, Public Health Sciences, Teviot Place, EH8 9AG, Edinburgh, UK. Amanda.Lee@ed.ac.uk

    , ,

    Source

    Journal of clinical epidemiology 54:4 2001 Apr pg 423-9

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Distribution
    Constipation
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Diet Surveys
    Dietary Fiber
    Family Practice
    Female
    Gastrointestinal Transit
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Population Surveillance
    Prevalence
    Registries
    Risk Factors
    Scotland
    Sex Distribution
    Socioeconomic Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Urban Health
    Varicose Veins

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    11297893

    Citation

    Lee, A J., et al. "Fiber Intake, Constipation, and Risk of Varicose Veins in the General Population: Edinburgh Vein Study." Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, vol. 54, no. 4, 2001, pp. 423-9.
    Lee AJ, Evans CJ, Hau CM, et al. Fiber intake, constipation, and risk of varicose veins in the general population: Edinburgh Vein Study. J Clin Epidemiol. 2001;54(4):423-9.
    Lee, A. J., Evans, C. J., Hau, C. M., & Fowkes, F. G. (2001). Fiber intake, constipation, and risk of varicose veins in the general population: Edinburgh Vein Study. Journal of Clinical Epidemiology, 54(4), pp. 423-9.
    Lee AJ, et al. Fiber Intake, Constipation, and Risk of Varicose Veins in the General Population: Edinburgh Vein Study. J Clin Epidemiol. 2001;54(4):423-9. PubMed PMID: 11297893.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Fiber intake, constipation, and risk of varicose veins in the general population: Edinburgh Vein Study. AU - Lee,A J, AU - Evans,C J, AU - Hau,C M, AU - Fowkes,F G, PY - 2001/4/12/pubmed PY - 2001/5/5/medline PY - 2001/4/12/entrez SP - 423 EP - 9 JF - Journal of clinical epidemiology JO - J Clin Epidemiol VL - 54 IS - 4 N2 - The purpose of the present study was to determine the relationship between fiber intake, constipation, and clinical venous disease in the general population. The Edinburgh Vein Study was comprised of 1566 men and women aged 18-64 years who were selected at random from the age-sex registers of 12 general practices. Fiber intake, intestinal transit time, defecation frequency and the prevalence of straining at stool were all found to be significantly different between the sexes. Men who reported that they strained to start passing a motion showed a higher prevalence of mild and severe trunk varices compared to men who did not strain. After adjustment for social class, BMI and mobility at work, this group of men showed a significantly elevated risk of having severe trunk varices (OR 2.76, 95% CI 1.16, 6.58). In contrast, no consistent relationships were seen among women. Overall, within this Western general population, an association between dietary fiber, constipation and the presence or severity of varicose veins was not supported. SN - 0895-4356 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11297893/Fiber_intake_constipation_and_risk_of_varicose_veins_in_the_general_population:_Edinburgh_Vein_Study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0895-4356(00)00300-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -