Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Psychological distress is linked to gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Apr; 96(4):1033-8.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus, but the pathogenesis is controversial. We aimed to determine if GI symptoms are linked to psychological distress in diabetes.

METHODS

A consecutive sample of outpatients with diabetes mellitus (n = 209) and a random sample of community diabetics (n = 892) completed a validated questionnaire measuring GI symptoms, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale for anxiety and depression, and the Eysenck short neuroticism scale.

RESULTS

Overall, 42% reported one or more GI symptoms: bloating, abdominal pain, loose stools, and urgency were most common. The mean HAD and neuroticism scores were significantly higher for most GI symptoms (11 of 14, all p < 0.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. GI symptoms were, in general, approximately twice as frequent in cases with anxiety or depression (HAD > or = 11). Anxiety, depression, and neuroticism were each independently associated with the number of GI symptoms, adjusting for age, gender, duration and type of diabetes, and self-reported glycemic control.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased levels of state anxiety and depression and neuroticism are associated with upper and lower GI symptoms in diabetes mellitus. It is uncertain whether psychological distress is causally linked to symptoms, or whether GI symptoms per se increase levels of anxiety and depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Nepean Hospital, NSW, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11316143

Citation

Talley, S J., et al. "Psychological Distress Is Linked to Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Diabetes Mellitus." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 96, no. 4, 2001, pp. 1033-8.
Talley SJ, Bytzer P, Hammer J, et al. Psychological distress is linked to gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001;96(4):1033-8.
Talley, S. J., Bytzer, P., Hammer, J., Young, L., Jones, M., & Horowitz, M. (2001). Psychological distress is linked to gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 96(4), 1033-8.
Talley SJ, et al. Psychological Distress Is Linked to Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Diabetes Mellitus. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001;96(4):1033-8. PubMed PMID: 11316143.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Psychological distress is linked to gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus. AU - Talley,S J, AU - Bytzer,P, AU - Hammer,J, AU - Young,L, AU - Jones,M, AU - Horowitz,M, PY - 2001/4/24/pubmed PY - 2001/6/29/medline PY - 2001/4/24/entrez SP - 1033 EP - 8 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 96 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are common in patients with long-standing diabetes mellitus, but the pathogenesis is controversial. We aimed to determine if GI symptoms are linked to psychological distress in diabetes. METHODS: A consecutive sample of outpatients with diabetes mellitus (n = 209) and a random sample of community diabetics (n = 892) completed a validated questionnaire measuring GI symptoms, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) Scale for anxiety and depression, and the Eysenck short neuroticism scale. RESULTS: Overall, 42% reported one or more GI symptoms: bloating, abdominal pain, loose stools, and urgency were most common. The mean HAD and neuroticism scores were significantly higher for most GI symptoms (11 of 14, all p < 0.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. GI symptoms were, in general, approximately twice as frequent in cases with anxiety or depression (HAD > or = 11). Anxiety, depression, and neuroticism were each independently associated with the number of GI symptoms, adjusting for age, gender, duration and type of diabetes, and self-reported glycemic control. CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of state anxiety and depression and neuroticism are associated with upper and lower GI symptoms in diabetes mellitus. It is uncertain whether psychological distress is causally linked to symptoms, or whether GI symptoms per se increase levels of anxiety and depression. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11316143/Psychological_distress_is_linked_to_gastrointestinal_symptoms_in_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1572-0241.2001.03605.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -