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Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with diabetes mellitus, nor with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus.
Am J Gastroenterol. 2001 Apr; 96(4):1039-46.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and diabetes mellitus is controversial. We aimed to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with diabetes and nondiabetic controls, and assess whether H. pylori infection was associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in diabetes mellitus.

METHODS

A total of 429 patients with type 1 (n = 49) or type 2 (n = 380) diabetes mellitus (48.6% women, mean age 60.7 yr) and 170 nondiabetic controls (34.7% women, mean age 60.4 yr) were evaluated. All subjects completed a validated questionnaire (the Diabetes Bowel Symptom Questionnaire) to determine upper GI symptoms, and a blood sample was tested for H. pylori infection using a validated ELISA kit (sensitivity 96%, specificity 94%).

RESULTS

Seroprevalence of H. pylori was 33% and 32%, respectively, in patients with diabetes and controls (NS). In both groups, the seroprevalence was significantly higher in men than in women; 39% vs 25% (p = 0.002) in diabetic patients, and 40% vs 20% (p = 0.01) in controls. Patients with diabetes had a significantly higher prevalence of early satiety (OR = 2.30), fullness (OR = 3.15), and bloating (OR = 1.50) compared with controls. Upper GI symptoms were present in 49% of H. pylori-positive and 53% of H. pylori-negative patients with diabetes (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.58-1.31, p = 0.56). H. pylori infection was also not associated with any of the individual upper GI symptoms before or after adjustment for potential confounding factors. However, patient age and female gender were identified as independent risk factors for upper GI symptoms. Smoking was a risk factor for bloating and early satiety.

CONCLUSIONS

H. pylori infection appears not to be associated with diabetes mellitus or upper GI symptoms in diabetes mellitus.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, University of Sydney, Nepean Hospital, Penrith, NSW, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11316144

Citation

Xia, H H., et al. "Helicobacter Pylori Infection Is Not Associated With Diabetes Mellitus, nor With Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Diabetes Mellitus." The American Journal of Gastroenterology, vol. 96, no. 4, 2001, pp. 1039-46.
Xia HH, Talley NJ, Kam EP, et al. Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with diabetes mellitus, nor with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001;96(4):1039-46.
Xia, H. H., Talley, N. J., Kam, E. P., Young, L. J., Hammer, J., & Horowitz, M. (2001). Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with diabetes mellitus, nor with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus. The American Journal of Gastroenterology, 96(4), 1039-46.
Xia HH, et al. Helicobacter Pylori Infection Is Not Associated With Diabetes Mellitus, nor With Upper Gastrointestinal Symptoms in Diabetes Mellitus. Am J Gastroenterol. 2001;96(4):1039-46. PubMed PMID: 11316144.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Helicobacter pylori infection is not associated with diabetes mellitus, nor with upper gastrointestinal symptoms in diabetes mellitus. AU - Xia,H H, AU - Talley,N J, AU - Kam,E P, AU - Young,L J, AU - Hammer,J, AU - Horowitz,M, PY - 2001/4/24/pubmed PY - 2001/6/29/medline PY - 2001/4/24/entrez SP - 1039 EP - 46 JF - The American journal of gastroenterology JO - Am J Gastroenterol VL - 96 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The association between Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and diabetes mellitus is controversial. We aimed to determine the prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with diabetes and nondiabetic controls, and assess whether H. pylori infection was associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in diabetes mellitus. METHODS: A total of 429 patients with type 1 (n = 49) or type 2 (n = 380) diabetes mellitus (48.6% women, mean age 60.7 yr) and 170 nondiabetic controls (34.7% women, mean age 60.4 yr) were evaluated. All subjects completed a validated questionnaire (the Diabetes Bowel Symptom Questionnaire) to determine upper GI symptoms, and a blood sample was tested for H. pylori infection using a validated ELISA kit (sensitivity 96%, specificity 94%). RESULTS: Seroprevalence of H. pylori was 33% and 32%, respectively, in patients with diabetes and controls (NS). In both groups, the seroprevalence was significantly higher in men than in women; 39% vs 25% (p = 0.002) in diabetic patients, and 40% vs 20% (p = 0.01) in controls. Patients with diabetes had a significantly higher prevalence of early satiety (OR = 2.30), fullness (OR = 3.15), and bloating (OR = 1.50) compared with controls. Upper GI symptoms were present in 49% of H. pylori-positive and 53% of H. pylori-negative patients with diabetes (OR = 0.87, 95% CI 0.58-1.31, p = 0.56). H. pylori infection was also not associated with any of the individual upper GI symptoms before or after adjustment for potential confounding factors. However, patient age and female gender were identified as independent risk factors for upper GI symptoms. Smoking was a risk factor for bloating and early satiety. CONCLUSIONS: H. pylori infection appears not to be associated with diabetes mellitus or upper GI symptoms in diabetes mellitus. SN - 0002-9270 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11316144/Helicobacter_pylori_infection_is_not_associated_with_diabetes_mellitus_nor_with_upper_gastrointestinal_symptoms_in_diabetes_mellitus_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1572-0241.2001.03604.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -