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Systematic review of the occurrence of infantile colic in the community.
Arch Dis Child 2001; 84(5):398-403AD

Abstract

AIMS

To assess the occurrence of infantile colic in the community and the need for professional help; and to study the influences of potential determinants of infantile colic.

METHODS

Surveys were identified by a systematic search in Medline (1966-98) and Embase (1988-98). Retrieved publications were checked for references. Studies selected were community based, prospective, and retrospective surveys on the occurrence of infantile colic published in English, German, French, or Dutch. Occurrence rates were calculated as percentages. Methodological quality of the surveys was assessed by two assessors independently with a standardised criteria list containing items on method of data gathering, definition of colic, and drop out rate.

RESULTS

Fifteen community based surveys were identified. The methodological quality varied considerably and was generally low. Even the two most methodologically sound prospective studies yielded widely varying cumulative incidence rates of 5-19%. Referral rates or the need to seek help because of crying were consistently lower than occurrence rates for prolonged crying as such. Gender, socioeconomic class, type of feeding, family history of atopy, and parental smoking were not shown to be associated with colic.

CONCLUSION

Occurrence rates of infantile colic vary greatly according to methodological quality. A considerable number of parents reporting prolonged crying do not seek or need professional help.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Research in Extramural Medicine, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam, Netherlands. p.lucassen1@chello.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11316682

Citation

Lucassen, P L., et al. "Systematic Review of the Occurrence of Infantile Colic in the Community." Archives of Disease in Childhood, vol. 84, no. 5, 2001, pp. 398-403.
Lucassen PL, Assendelft WJ, van Eijk JT, et al. Systematic review of the occurrence of infantile colic in the community. Arch Dis Child. 2001;84(5):398-403.
Lucassen, P. L., Assendelft, W. J., van Eijk, J. T., Gubbels, J. W., Douwes, A. C., & van Geldrop, W. J. (2001). Systematic review of the occurrence of infantile colic in the community. Archives of Disease in Childhood, 84(5), pp. 398-403.
Lucassen PL, et al. Systematic Review of the Occurrence of Infantile Colic in the Community. Arch Dis Child. 2001;84(5):398-403. PubMed PMID: 11316682.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Systematic review of the occurrence of infantile colic in the community. AU - Lucassen,P L, AU - Assendelft,W J, AU - van Eijk,J T, AU - Gubbels,J W, AU - Douwes,A C, AU - van Geldrop,W J, PY - 2001/4/24/pubmed PY - 2001/6/2/medline PY - 2001/4/24/entrez SP - 398 EP - 403 JF - Archives of disease in childhood JO - Arch. Dis. Child. VL - 84 IS - 5 N2 - AIMS: To assess the occurrence of infantile colic in the community and the need for professional help; and to study the influences of potential determinants of infantile colic. METHODS: Surveys were identified by a systematic search in Medline (1966-98) and Embase (1988-98). Retrieved publications were checked for references. Studies selected were community based, prospective, and retrospective surveys on the occurrence of infantile colic published in English, German, French, or Dutch. Occurrence rates were calculated as percentages. Methodological quality of the surveys was assessed by two assessors independently with a standardised criteria list containing items on method of data gathering, definition of colic, and drop out rate. RESULTS: Fifteen community based surveys were identified. The methodological quality varied considerably and was generally low. Even the two most methodologically sound prospective studies yielded widely varying cumulative incidence rates of 5-19%. Referral rates or the need to seek help because of crying were consistently lower than occurrence rates for prolonged crying as such. Gender, socioeconomic class, type of feeding, family history of atopy, and parental smoking were not shown to be associated with colic. CONCLUSION: Occurrence rates of infantile colic vary greatly according to methodological quality. A considerable number of parents reporting prolonged crying do not seek or need professional help. SN - 1468-2044 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11316682/full_citation L2 - http://adc.bmj.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=11316682 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -