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Heat strain evaluation of chemical protective garments.
Aviat Space Environ Med. 2001 Apr; 72(4):329-35.AS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The purpose of this study was to compare thermoregulatory and subjective responses of 12 test subjects (10 male, 2 female) wearing 5 different Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) prototype and 3 different currently fielded control chemical/ biological (CB) protective overgarments.

METHODS

The overgarments were compared while subjects attempted to complete 100 min of moderate exercise (400 W) in an environmental chamber (35 degrees C/50% rh). Rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperature, heart rate, sweating rate, and test time, as well as subjective symptoms of heat illness were measured. Data were analyzed for times earlier than 100 min because subjects were not usually able to complete the 100-min trials.

RESULTS

At 50 min, of the 3 controls, the Army/Air Force Battledress Overgarment (BDO) imposed significantly greater heat strain (indicated by Tre 37.90 degrees C) than the Marine Saratoga (SAR) (Tre 37.68 degrees C) and Navy Chemical Protective Overgarment (CPO) (Tre 37.69 degrees C). The JSLIST prototype garments imposed heat strain (50 min Tre 37.73-37.86 degrees C) as well as subjective perception of heat strain, that ranged between the warmest and coolest controls.

CONCLUSIONS

In the environmental and exercise test conditions of this study, we did not find the five JSLIST overgarments to be consistently different from one another. Subjects in the control garments were and felt generally warmer (BDO) or cooler (SAR, CPO) than in the JSLIST prototype garments.

Authors+Show Affiliations

United States Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA 01760-5007, USA. leslie.levine@na.amedd.army.milNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11318011

Citation

Levine, L, et al. "Heat Strain Evaluation of Chemical Protective Garments." Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, vol. 72, no. 4, 2001, pp. 329-35.
Levine L, Johnson RF, Teal WB, et al. Heat strain evaluation of chemical protective garments. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2001;72(4):329-35.
Levine, L., Johnson, R. F., Teal, W. B., Merullo, D. J., Cadarette, B. S., Staab, J. E., Blanchard, L. A., Kolka, M. A., & Sawka, M. N. (2001). Heat strain evaluation of chemical protective garments. Aviation, Space, and Environmental Medicine, 72(4), 329-35.
Levine L, et al. Heat Strain Evaluation of Chemical Protective Garments. Aviat Space Environ Med. 2001;72(4):329-35. PubMed PMID: 11318011.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Heat strain evaluation of chemical protective garments. AU - Levine,L, AU - Johnson,R F, AU - Teal,W B,Jr AU - Merullo,D J, AU - Cadarette,B S, AU - Staab,J E, AU - Blanchard,L A, AU - Kolka,M A, AU - Sawka,M N, PY - 2001/4/25/pubmed PY - 2001/7/28/medline PY - 2001/4/25/entrez SP - 329 EP - 35 JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine JO - Aviat Space Environ Med VL - 72 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to compare thermoregulatory and subjective responses of 12 test subjects (10 male, 2 female) wearing 5 different Joint Service Lightweight Integrated Suit Technology (JSLIST) prototype and 3 different currently fielded control chemical/ biological (CB) protective overgarments. METHODS: The overgarments were compared while subjects attempted to complete 100 min of moderate exercise (400 W) in an environmental chamber (35 degrees C/50% rh). Rectal temperature (Tre), skin temperature, heart rate, sweating rate, and test time, as well as subjective symptoms of heat illness were measured. Data were analyzed for times earlier than 100 min because subjects were not usually able to complete the 100-min trials. RESULTS: At 50 min, of the 3 controls, the Army/Air Force Battledress Overgarment (BDO) imposed significantly greater heat strain (indicated by Tre 37.90 degrees C) than the Marine Saratoga (SAR) (Tre 37.68 degrees C) and Navy Chemical Protective Overgarment (CPO) (Tre 37.69 degrees C). The JSLIST prototype garments imposed heat strain (50 min Tre 37.73-37.86 degrees C) as well as subjective perception of heat strain, that ranged between the warmest and coolest controls. CONCLUSIONS: In the environmental and exercise test conditions of this study, we did not find the five JSLIST overgarments to be consistently different from one another. Subjects in the control garments were and felt generally warmer (BDO) or cooler (SAR, CPO) than in the JSLIST prototype garments. SN - 0095-6562 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11318011/Heat_strain_evaluation_of_chemical_protective_garments_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/heatillness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -