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Body mass index, height, and prostate cancer mortality in two large cohorts of adult men in the United States.

Abstract

Body weight and height have both been associated consistently with postmenopausal breast cancer but less consistently with prostate cancer. The present study examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), height, and death from prostate cancer in two large American Cancer Society cohorts. Men in the study were selected from the male participants in Cancer Prevention Study I (CPS-I; enrolled in 1959 and followed through 1972) and Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II; enrolled in 1982 and followed through 1996). After exclusions, 1,590 prostate cancer deaths remained among 381,638 men in CPS-I and 3,622 deaths among 434,630 men in CPS-II. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to compute rate ratios (RR) and to adjust for confounders. Prostate cancer mortality rates were significantly higher among obese (BMI, > or =30) than nonobese (BMI, <25) men in both cohorts [adjusted RR, 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.56 in CPS-I; RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37 in CPS-II]. Prostate cancer mortality rates in the CPS-I cohort were lowest for the shortest men (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.63-1.03 for men <65 inches versus 65-66 inches) and highest for the tallest men (RR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.11-1.74 for men > or =73 inches tall versus 65-66 inches). Rates remained constant among men 65-72 inches tall. No association between height and prostate cancer mortality was observed in the CPS-II cohort (RR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.82-1.29 for men > or =75 versus 65-66 inches). These results support the hypothesis that obesity increases risk of prostate cancer mortality. Decreased survival among obese men may be a likely explanation for this association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia 30329-4251, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11319175

Citation

Rodriguez, C, et al. "Body Mass Index, Height, and Prostate Cancer Mortality in Two Large Cohorts of Adult Men in the United States." Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, vol. 10, no. 4, 2001, pp. 345-53.
Rodriguez C, Patel AV, Calle EE, et al. Body mass index, height, and prostate cancer mortality in two large cohorts of adult men in the United States. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001;10(4):345-53.
Rodriguez, C., Patel, A. V., Calle, E. E., Jacobs, E. J., Chao, A., & Thun, M. J. (2001). Body mass index, height, and prostate cancer mortality in two large cohorts of adult men in the United States. Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention : a Publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, Cosponsored By the American Society of Preventive Oncology, 10(4), pp. 345-53.
Rodriguez C, et al. Body Mass Index, Height, and Prostate Cancer Mortality in Two Large Cohorts of Adult Men in the United States. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001;10(4):345-53. PubMed PMID: 11319175.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Body mass index, height, and prostate cancer mortality in two large cohorts of adult men in the United States. AU - Rodriguez,C, AU - Patel,A V, AU - Calle,E E, AU - Jacobs,E J, AU - Chao,A, AU - Thun,M J, PY - 2001/4/25/pubmed PY - 2001/8/10/medline PY - 2001/4/25/entrez SP - 345 EP - 53 JF - Cancer epidemiology, biomarkers & prevention : a publication of the American Association for Cancer Research, cosponsored by the American Society of Preventive Oncology JO - Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev. VL - 10 IS - 4 N2 - Body weight and height have both been associated consistently with postmenopausal breast cancer but less consistently with prostate cancer. The present study examined the relationship between body mass index (BMI), height, and death from prostate cancer in two large American Cancer Society cohorts. Men in the study were selected from the male participants in Cancer Prevention Study I (CPS-I; enrolled in 1959 and followed through 1972) and Cancer Prevention Study II (CPS-II; enrolled in 1982 and followed through 1996). After exclusions, 1,590 prostate cancer deaths remained among 381,638 men in CPS-I and 3,622 deaths among 434,630 men in CPS-II. Cox proportional hazards modeling was used to compute rate ratios (RR) and to adjust for confounders. Prostate cancer mortality rates were significantly higher among obese (BMI, > or =30) than nonobese (BMI, <25) men in both cohorts [adjusted RR, 1.27; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.04-1.56 in CPS-I; RR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.07-1.37 in CPS-II]. Prostate cancer mortality rates in the CPS-I cohort were lowest for the shortest men (RR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.63-1.03 for men <65 inches versus 65-66 inches) and highest for the tallest men (RR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.11-1.74 for men > or =73 inches tall versus 65-66 inches). Rates remained constant among men 65-72 inches tall. No association between height and prostate cancer mortality was observed in the CPS-II cohort (RR, 1.03; 95% CI, 0.82-1.29 for men > or =75 versus 65-66 inches). These results support the hypothesis that obesity increases risk of prostate cancer mortality. Decreased survival among obese men may be a likely explanation for this association. SN - 1055-9965 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11319175/Body_mass_index_height_and_prostate_cancer_mortality_in_two_large_cohorts_of_adult_men_in_the_United_States_ L2 - http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=11319175 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -