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Addressing intimate partner violence in primary care practice.
Medscape Womens Health. 2001 Jan; 6(1):E1.MW

Abstract

Primary care practice provides an ideal opportunity for the discussion of the remarkably prevalent yet often hidden problem of intimate partner violence. Patients report that screening of intimate partner violence is acceptable, yet most providers do not discuss intimate partner violence with their patients. The purpose of this article is 3-fold: to outline what is known about the prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and why providers should discuss intimate partner violence with their patients, to review recommended screening policy and how to ask about and intervene in cases of intimate partner violence, and finally to provide suggestions for institutionalizing a clinical response to intimate partner violence.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of General Internal Medicine at San Francisco General Hospital, UCSF, USA.

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11320351

Citation

Kimberg, L. "Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Primary Care Practice." Medscape Women's Health, vol. 6, no. 1, 2001, pp. E1.
Kimberg L. Addressing intimate partner violence in primary care practice. Medscape Womens Health. 2001;6(1):E1.
Kimberg, L. (2001). Addressing intimate partner violence in primary care practice. Medscape Women's Health, 6(1), E1.
Kimberg L. Addressing Intimate Partner Violence in Primary Care Practice. Medscape Womens Health. 2001;6(1):E1. PubMed PMID: 11320351.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Addressing intimate partner violence in primary care practice. A1 - Kimberg,L, PY - 2001/4/26/pubmed PY - 2002/1/24/medline PY - 2001/4/26/entrez SP - E1 EP - E1 JF - Medscape women's health JO - Medscape Womens Health VL - 6 IS - 1 N2 - Primary care practice provides an ideal opportunity for the discussion of the remarkably prevalent yet often hidden problem of intimate partner violence. Patients report that screening of intimate partner violence is acceptable, yet most providers do not discuss intimate partner violence with their patients. The purpose of this article is 3-fold: to outline what is known about the prevalence and health effects of intimate partner violence and why providers should discuss intimate partner violence with their patients, to review recommended screening policy and how to ask about and intervene in cases of intimate partner violence, and finally to provide suggestions for institutionalizing a clinical response to intimate partner violence. SN - 1521-2076 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11320351/Addressing_intimate_partner_violence_in_primary_care_practice_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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