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Effect of vaccination by community pharmacists among adult prescription recipients.
Med Care. 2001 Apr; 39(4):340-8.MC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Millions of doses of influenza vaccine are administered each year in the United States at nontraditional sites and by nontraditional vaccine providers. Pharmacists are increasingly becoming vaccine providers.

OBJECTIVES

To measure association between availability of pharmacist-immunizers and immunization delivery to adult prescription recipients, and the relative contributions of various types of vaccine providers.

RESEARCH DESIGN

Mailed survey in spring 1999, contrasting adults in urban Washington State, where pharmacists administer vaccines, to adults in urban Oregon, where pharmacists did not.

SUBJECTS

Cluster sample based on October 1998 prescription records suggesting need for influenza vaccine, derived from 24 community pharmacies belonging to one pharmacy chain.

MEASURES

Vaccination status and choice of vaccine provider.

RESULTS

Influenza vaccination rates among respondents 65 years or older increased 4.7% more in Washington than in Oregon between 1997 and 1998 (P = 0.20). The net increase in influenza vaccination rate among younger respondents taking indicator medications for chronic diseases for which influenza vaccination is recommended was 10.6% (P = 0.05). Among respondents unvaccinated against influenza in 1997, the 1998 influenza vaccination rate was 34.7% in Washington, compared with 23.9% in Oregon (P = 0.01).

CONCLUSIONS

Vaccine delivery by pharmacists is associated with higher rates of vaccination among those younger than 65 taking indicator medications medications for chronic diseases, as well as prescription recipients unvaccinated against influenza in the previous year.

Authors+Show Affiliations

US Army Medical Command, Falls Church, Virginia, USA. Grabenstein@mindspring.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11329521

Citation

Grabenstein, J D., et al. "Effect of Vaccination By Community Pharmacists Among Adult Prescription Recipients." Medical Care, vol. 39, no. 4, 2001, pp. 340-8.
Grabenstein JD, Guess HA, Hartzema AG, et al. Effect of vaccination by community pharmacists among adult prescription recipients. Med Care. 2001;39(4):340-8.
Grabenstein, J. D., Guess, H. A., Hartzema, A. G., Koch, G. G., & Konrad, T. R. (2001). Effect of vaccination by community pharmacists among adult prescription recipients. Medical Care, 39(4), 340-8.
Grabenstein JD, et al. Effect of Vaccination By Community Pharmacists Among Adult Prescription Recipients. Med Care. 2001;39(4):340-8. PubMed PMID: 11329521.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of vaccination by community pharmacists among adult prescription recipients. AU - Grabenstein,J D, AU - Guess,H A, AU - Hartzema,A G, AU - Koch,G G, AU - Konrad,T R, PY - 2001/5/1/pubmed PY - 2001/6/2/medline PY - 2001/5/1/entrez SP - 340 EP - 8 JF - Medical care JO - Med Care VL - 39 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Millions of doses of influenza vaccine are administered each year in the United States at nontraditional sites and by nontraditional vaccine providers. Pharmacists are increasingly becoming vaccine providers. OBJECTIVES: To measure association between availability of pharmacist-immunizers and immunization delivery to adult prescription recipients, and the relative contributions of various types of vaccine providers. RESEARCH DESIGN: Mailed survey in spring 1999, contrasting adults in urban Washington State, where pharmacists administer vaccines, to adults in urban Oregon, where pharmacists did not. SUBJECTS: Cluster sample based on October 1998 prescription records suggesting need for influenza vaccine, derived from 24 community pharmacies belonging to one pharmacy chain. MEASURES: Vaccination status and choice of vaccine provider. RESULTS: Influenza vaccination rates among respondents 65 years or older increased 4.7% more in Washington than in Oregon between 1997 and 1998 (P = 0.20). The net increase in influenza vaccination rate among younger respondents taking indicator medications for chronic diseases for which influenza vaccination is recommended was 10.6% (P = 0.05). Among respondents unvaccinated against influenza in 1997, the 1998 influenza vaccination rate was 34.7% in Washington, compared with 23.9% in Oregon (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Vaccine delivery by pharmacists is associated with higher rates of vaccination among those younger than 65 taking indicator medications medications for chronic diseases, as well as prescription recipients unvaccinated against influenza in the previous year. SN - 0025-7079 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11329521/Effect_of_vaccination_by_community_pharmacists_among_adult_prescription_recipients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/00005650-200104000-00005 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -