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Irritable bowel syndrome and dietary fiber.
J Am Diet Assoc. 1979 Oct; 75(4):452-3.JA

Abstract

The effects of an increase in dietary fiber include: (a) More frequent stools, (b) more voluminous stools, (c) an alteration in the fecal flora, (d) an increase in fecal sterol excretion, and, it appears likely, (e) a reduction in intraluminal pressures in the sigmoid colon. Epidemiologic data comparing global differences in prevalence of certain diseases with the fiber content of diets suggest that there may be a relationship between the two. With a certain amount of post-ad hoc reasoning, it can be shown that some of the known effects of fiber could account for differences in disease prevalence between populations. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome is so high that one is forced to concede the very real possibility that the environment, including the diet, may be responsible for symptoms that might not otherwise exist. It remains to be seen whether a marked increase in dietary fiber will prevent the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. It seems fairly certain that, given the preoccupation most of these individuals have with their bowel movements, the large bulky stools resulting from a high-fiber diet satisfy a very basic emotional need to "have a good BM" (meaning large), but whether this leads to better health remains to be proved.

Authors

No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

113444

Citation

Achord, J L.. "Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Dietary Fiber." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 75, no. 4, 1979, pp. 452-3.
Achord JL. Irritable bowel syndrome and dietary fiber. J Am Diet Assoc. 1979;75(4):452-3.
Achord, J. L. (1979). Irritable bowel syndrome and dietary fiber. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 75(4), 452-3.
Achord JL. Irritable Bowel Syndrome and Dietary Fiber. J Am Diet Assoc. 1979;75(4):452-3. PubMed PMID: 113444.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Irritable bowel syndrome and dietary fiber. A1 - Achord,J L, PY - 1979/10/1/pubmed PY - 1979/10/1/medline PY - 1979/10/1/entrez SP - 452 EP - 3 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 75 IS - 4 N2 - The effects of an increase in dietary fiber include: (a) More frequent stools, (b) more voluminous stools, (c) an alteration in the fecal flora, (d) an increase in fecal sterol excretion, and, it appears likely, (e) a reduction in intraluminal pressures in the sigmoid colon. Epidemiologic data comparing global differences in prevalence of certain diseases with the fiber content of diets suggest that there may be a relationship between the two. With a certain amount of post-ad hoc reasoning, it can be shown that some of the known effects of fiber could account for differences in disease prevalence between populations. The prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome is so high that one is forced to concede the very real possibility that the environment, including the diet, may be responsible for symptoms that might not otherwise exist. It remains to be seen whether a marked increase in dietary fiber will prevent the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome. It seems fairly certain that, given the preoccupation most of these individuals have with their bowel movements, the large bulky stools resulting from a high-fiber diet satisfy a very basic emotional need to "have a good BM" (meaning large), but whether this leads to better health remains to be proved. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/113444/Irritable_bowel_syndrome_and_dietary_fiber_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/3876 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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