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Growth of visceral fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and total body fat in children.
Obes Res. 2001 May; 9(5):283-9.OR

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To examine the patterns of growth of visceral fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and total body fat over a 3- to 5-year period in white and African American children.

RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES

Children (mean age: 8.1 +/- 1.6 years at baseline) were recruited from Birmingham, Alabama, and those with three or more repeated annual measurements were included in the analysis (N = 138 children and 601 observations). Abdominal adipose tissue (visceral and subcutaneous) was measured using computed tomography. Total body fat and lean tissue mass were measured by DXA. Random growth curve modeling was performed to estimate growth rates of the different body fat compartments.

RESULTS

Visceral fat and total body fat both exhibited significant growth effects before and after adjusting for subcutaneous abdominal fat and lean tissue mass, respectively, and for gender, race, and baseline age (5.2 +/- 2.2 cm(2)/yr and 1.9 +/- 0.8 kg/yr, respectively). After adjusting for total body fat, the growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat was not significant. Whites showed a higher visceral fat growth than did African Americans (difference: 1.9 +/- 0.8 cm(2)/yr), but there was no ethnic difference for growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat or total body fat. There were no gender differences found for any of the growth rates.

DISCUSSION

Growth of visceral fat remained significant after adjusting for growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat, implying that the acquisition of the two abdominal fat compartments may involve different physiologic mechanisms. In contrast, growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat was explained by growth in total body fat, suggesting that subcutaneous fat may not be preferentially deposited in the abdominal area during this phase of growth. Finally, significantly higher growth of visceral fat in white compared with African American children is consistent with cross-sectional findings.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive Medicine, Institute for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11346669

Citation

Huang, T T., et al. "Growth of Visceral Fat, Subcutaneous Abdominal Fat, and Total Body Fat in Children." Obesity Research, vol. 9, no. 5, 2001, pp. 283-9.
Huang TT, Johnson MS, Figueroa-Colon R, et al. Growth of visceral fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and total body fat in children. Obes Res. 2001;9(5):283-9.
Huang, T. T., Johnson, M. S., Figueroa-Colon, R., Dwyer, J. H., & Goran, M. I. (2001). Growth of visceral fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and total body fat in children. Obesity Research, 9(5), 283-9.
Huang TT, et al. Growth of Visceral Fat, Subcutaneous Abdominal Fat, and Total Body Fat in Children. Obes Res. 2001;9(5):283-9. PubMed PMID: 11346669.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Growth of visceral fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and total body fat in children. AU - Huang,T T, AU - Johnson,M S, AU - Figueroa-Colon,R, AU - Dwyer,J H, AU - Goran,M I, PY - 2001/5/11/pubmed PY - 2001/6/29/medline PY - 2001/5/11/entrez SP - 283 EP - 9 JF - Obesity research JO - Obes Res VL - 9 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the patterns of growth of visceral fat, subcutaneous abdominal fat, and total body fat over a 3- to 5-year period in white and African American children. RESEARCH METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Children (mean age: 8.1 +/- 1.6 years at baseline) were recruited from Birmingham, Alabama, and those with three or more repeated annual measurements were included in the analysis (N = 138 children and 601 observations). Abdominal adipose tissue (visceral and subcutaneous) was measured using computed tomography. Total body fat and lean tissue mass were measured by DXA. Random growth curve modeling was performed to estimate growth rates of the different body fat compartments. RESULTS: Visceral fat and total body fat both exhibited significant growth effects before and after adjusting for subcutaneous abdominal fat and lean tissue mass, respectively, and for gender, race, and baseline age (5.2 +/- 2.2 cm(2)/yr and 1.9 +/- 0.8 kg/yr, respectively). After adjusting for total body fat, the growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat was not significant. Whites showed a higher visceral fat growth than did African Americans (difference: 1.9 +/- 0.8 cm(2)/yr), but there was no ethnic difference for growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat or total body fat. There were no gender differences found for any of the growth rates. DISCUSSION: Growth of visceral fat remained significant after adjusting for growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat, implying that the acquisition of the two abdominal fat compartments may involve different physiologic mechanisms. In contrast, growth of subcutaneous abdominal fat was explained by growth in total body fat, suggesting that subcutaneous fat may not be preferentially deposited in the abdominal area during this phase of growth. Finally, significantly higher growth of visceral fat in white compared with African American children is consistent with cross-sectional findings. SN - 1071-7323 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11346669/Growth_of_visceral_fat_subcutaneous_abdominal_fat_and_total_body_fat_in_children_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1038/oby.2001.35 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -