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Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: twenty years of experience at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia.
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001 May; 184(6):1127-30.AJ

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

We compared pregnancy outcomes among women with sickle cell disease with outcomes for African American women without the disease.

STUDY DESIGN

We selected 127 deliveries in women with sickle cell disease (hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin SC) that occurred between 1980 and 1999. A control group of 129 deliveries by African American women with normal hemoglobin (hemoglobin AA) was also selected. Evaluated pregnancy outcomes included low birth weight, prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction, antepartum hospital admission, preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes, postpartum infection, preeclampsia, pyelonephritis, intrauterine fetal death, perinatal mortality, and maternal mortality.

RESULTS

Compared with deliveries among women with hemoglobin AA, deliveries among women with hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin SC were at increased risk for intrauterine growth restriction, antepartum hospital admission, and postpartum infection. In addition, deliveries among women with Hb SS were more likely to be complicated by low birth weight, prematurity, and preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes when compared with deliveries among women with hemoglobin AA. There were no significant differences among the groups (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, and hemoglobin AA) in terms of perinatal deaths; there were no maternal deaths in the study population.

CONCLUSION

Those caring for women with sickle cell disease should be aware that they are at increased risk for pregnancy complications, although overall pregnancy outcome is favorable.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11349177

Citation

Sun, P M., et al. "Sickle Cell Disease in Pregnancy: Twenty Years of Experience at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia." American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, vol. 184, no. 6, 2001, pp. 1127-30.
Sun PM, Wilburn W, Raynor BD, et al. Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: twenty years of experience at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001;184(6):1127-30.
Sun, P. M., Wilburn, W., Raynor, B. D., & Jamieson, D. (2001). Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: twenty years of experience at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 184(6), 1127-30.
Sun PM, et al. Sickle Cell Disease in Pregnancy: Twenty Years of Experience at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2001;184(6):1127-30. PubMed PMID: 11349177.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sickle cell disease in pregnancy: twenty years of experience at Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia. AU - Sun,P M, AU - Wilburn,W, AU - Raynor,B D, AU - Jamieson,D, PY - 2001/5/12/pubmed PY - 2001/6/22/medline PY - 2001/5/12/entrez SP - 1127 EP - 30 JF - American journal of obstetrics and gynecology JO - Am J Obstet Gynecol VL - 184 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: We compared pregnancy outcomes among women with sickle cell disease with outcomes for African American women without the disease. STUDY DESIGN: We selected 127 deliveries in women with sickle cell disease (hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin SC) that occurred between 1980 and 1999. A control group of 129 deliveries by African American women with normal hemoglobin (hemoglobin AA) was also selected. Evaluated pregnancy outcomes included low birth weight, prematurity, intrauterine growth restriction, antepartum hospital admission, preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes, postpartum infection, preeclampsia, pyelonephritis, intrauterine fetal death, perinatal mortality, and maternal mortality. RESULTS: Compared with deliveries among women with hemoglobin AA, deliveries among women with hemoglobin SS or hemoglobin SC were at increased risk for intrauterine growth restriction, antepartum hospital admission, and postpartum infection. In addition, deliveries among women with Hb SS were more likely to be complicated by low birth weight, prematurity, and preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes when compared with deliveries among women with hemoglobin AA. There were no significant differences among the groups (hemoglobin SS, hemoglobin SC, and hemoglobin AA) in terms of perinatal deaths; there were no maternal deaths in the study population. CONCLUSION: Those caring for women with sickle cell disease should be aware that they are at increased risk for pregnancy complications, although overall pregnancy outcome is favorable. SN - 0002-9378 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11349177/Sickle_cell_disease_in_pregnancy:_twenty_years_of_experience_at_Grady_Memorial_Hospital_Atlanta_Georgia_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-9378(01)29789-0 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -