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Cohort analysis of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer mortality in European men.
Int J Cancer 2001; 92(6):913-8IJ

Abstract

Our aim was to examine the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer mortality in a cohort of European males. Around 1970, dietary intake of Finnish, Italian and Dutch middle-aged men was assessed using a cross-check dietary history. Complete baseline information was available for 3,108 men, of whom 1,578 were baseline smokers. We used Cox proportional hazard analyses to calculate risk estimates for the consumption in country-specific tertiles on lung cancer in smokers. During 25 years of follow-up, 149 lung cancer deaths occurred in the smokers. Fruit consumption was inversely associated with lung cancer mortality among smokers; compared with the lowest, adjusted RRs for the intermediate and highest tertiles were 0.56 (0.37-0.84) and 0.69 (0.46-1.02), p-trend 0.05. Only in the Dutch cohort was this association statistically significant [adjusted relative risks (RRs) 1.00, 0.33 (0.16-0.70) and 0.35 (0.16-0.74), p-trend 0.004]. In Finland lung cancer risk was lower with higher fruit intake but not significantly, whereas in Italy no association was observed. Stratifying on cigarette smoking intensity (non, light and heavy) revealed an inverse association in the heavy smokers only [adjusted RRs (95% confidence intervals [CI]) 1; 0.47 (0.26-0.84); 0.40 (0.20-0.78)). Vegetable consumption was not related to lung cancer risk in smokers. However, analyses stratified on cigarette smoking intensity gave some indication for a lower lung cancer risk with higher intake. In conclusion, in this prospective analysis among European smoking men, fruit intake was inversely related to lung cancer mortality. This association was confined to heavy cigarette smokers.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Chronic Diseases Epidemiology, National Institute of Public Health and the Environment, Bilthoven, The Netherlands. marje.jansen@rivm.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11351316

Citation

Jansen, M C., et al. "Cohort Analysis of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Lung Cancer Mortality in European Men." International Journal of Cancer, vol. 92, no. 6, 2001, pp. 913-8.
Jansen MC, Bueno-de-Mesquita HB, Räsänen L, et al. Cohort analysis of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer mortality in European men. Int J Cancer. 2001;92(6):913-8.
Jansen, M. C., Bueno-de-Mesquita, H. B., Räsänen, L., Fidanza, F., Nissinen, A. M., Menotti, A., ... Kromhout, D. (2001). Cohort analysis of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer mortality in European men. International Journal of Cancer, 92(6), pp. 913-8.
Jansen MC, et al. Cohort Analysis of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption and Lung Cancer Mortality in European Men. Int J Cancer. 2001 Jun 15;92(6):913-8. PubMed PMID: 11351316.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Cohort analysis of fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer mortality in European men. AU - Jansen,M C, AU - Bueno-de-Mesquita,H B, AU - Räsänen,L, AU - Fidanza,F, AU - Nissinen,A M, AU - Menotti,A, AU - Kok,F J, AU - Kromhout,D, PY - 2001/5/15/pubmed PY - 2001/6/29/medline PY - 2001/5/15/entrez SP - 913 EP - 8 JF - International journal of cancer JO - Int. J. Cancer VL - 92 IS - 6 N2 - Our aim was to examine the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer mortality in a cohort of European males. Around 1970, dietary intake of Finnish, Italian and Dutch middle-aged men was assessed using a cross-check dietary history. Complete baseline information was available for 3,108 men, of whom 1,578 were baseline smokers. We used Cox proportional hazard analyses to calculate risk estimates for the consumption in country-specific tertiles on lung cancer in smokers. During 25 years of follow-up, 149 lung cancer deaths occurred in the smokers. Fruit consumption was inversely associated with lung cancer mortality among smokers; compared with the lowest, adjusted RRs for the intermediate and highest tertiles were 0.56 (0.37-0.84) and 0.69 (0.46-1.02), p-trend 0.05. Only in the Dutch cohort was this association statistically significant [adjusted relative risks (RRs) 1.00, 0.33 (0.16-0.70) and 0.35 (0.16-0.74), p-trend 0.004]. In Finland lung cancer risk was lower with higher fruit intake but not significantly, whereas in Italy no association was observed. Stratifying on cigarette smoking intensity (non, light and heavy) revealed an inverse association in the heavy smokers only [adjusted RRs (95% confidence intervals [CI]) 1; 0.47 (0.26-0.84); 0.40 (0.20-0.78)). Vegetable consumption was not related to lung cancer risk in smokers. However, analyses stratified on cigarette smoking intensity gave some indication for a lower lung cancer risk with higher intake. In conclusion, in this prospective analysis among European smoking men, fruit intake was inversely related to lung cancer mortality. This association was confined to heavy cigarette smokers. SN - 0020-7136 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11351316/Cohort_analysis_of_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_and_lung_cancer_mortality_in_European_men_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&sid=nlm:pubmed&issn=0020-7136&date=2001&volume=92&issue=6&spage=913 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -