Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Social influences on health-risk behaviors among minority middle school students.
J Adolesc Health. 2001 Jun; 28(6):474-80.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

To determine whether parent social influences are associated with health-risk behaviors more than peer social influences among young minority adolescents.

METHODS

We conducted a cross-sectional survey of seventh-grade students in a public urban magnet middle school using a survey instrument adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The sample consisted of all seventh-grade students in the school, and the survey was part of a needs assessment for a school-based health education program. We measured four health-risk behaviors: use of (a) tobacco, (b) alcohol, (c) onset of sexual activity, and (d) marijuana use; and five social influences: (a) parent disapproval of health-risk behaviors, (b) parent modeling of health-risk behaviors, (c) parent monitoring of health-risks, (d) peer disapproval of health risks, and (e) peer modeling of health-risk behaviors. The analyses included measures of the prevalence of health-risk behaviors, bivariate analyses to evaluate relationships between health-risk behaviors and social influences, and regressions analyses to determine the independent associations of the social influences with the four health-risk behaviors.

RESULTS

Twenty percent of respondents reported using tobacco, over 50% used alcohol in the past year, 13.3% were sexually active, and 12% reported marijuana use. Parent influences were associated with differences in alcohol use, whereas peer influences were associated with differences in all measured health-risk behaviors: tobacco and alcohol use, sexual activity, and marijuana use. Regression analyses demonstrated that peer social influences were the only measures independently associated with abstinence from tobacco (p < .05), alcohol (p < .01), sexual activity (p < .05), and marijuana use (p < .05). In all analyses, peers emerged as the most consistent social influence on health-risk behavior.

CONCLUSION

This study suggests peers and peer group behavior may be better predictors of adolescent health-risk behaviors than parental social influences among young adolescents.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Center for Child and Adolescent Health Policy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA. abeal@partners.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11377991

Citation

Beal, A C., et al. "Social Influences On Health-risk Behaviors Among Minority Middle School Students." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 28, no. 6, 2001, pp. 474-80.
Beal AC, Ausiello J, Perrin JM. Social influences on health-risk behaviors among minority middle school students. J Adolesc Health. 2001;28(6):474-80.
Beal, A. C., Ausiello, J., & Perrin, J. M. (2001). Social influences on health-risk behaviors among minority middle school students. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 28(6), 474-80.
Beal AC, Ausiello J, Perrin JM. Social Influences On Health-risk Behaviors Among Minority Middle School Students. J Adolesc Health. 2001;28(6):474-80. PubMed PMID: 11377991.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Social influences on health-risk behaviors among minority middle school students. AU - Beal,A C, AU - Ausiello,J, AU - Perrin,J M, PY - 2001/5/30/pubmed PY - 2001/7/28/medline PY - 2001/5/30/entrez SP - 474 EP - 80 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 28 IS - 6 N2 - PURPOSE: To determine whether parent social influences are associated with health-risk behaviors more than peer social influences among young minority adolescents. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of seventh-grade students in a public urban magnet middle school using a survey instrument adapted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Youth Risk Behavior Survey. The sample consisted of all seventh-grade students in the school, and the survey was part of a needs assessment for a school-based health education program. We measured four health-risk behaviors: use of (a) tobacco, (b) alcohol, (c) onset of sexual activity, and (d) marijuana use; and five social influences: (a) parent disapproval of health-risk behaviors, (b) parent modeling of health-risk behaviors, (c) parent monitoring of health-risks, (d) peer disapproval of health risks, and (e) peer modeling of health-risk behaviors. The analyses included measures of the prevalence of health-risk behaviors, bivariate analyses to evaluate relationships between health-risk behaviors and social influences, and regressions analyses to determine the independent associations of the social influences with the four health-risk behaviors. RESULTS: Twenty percent of respondents reported using tobacco, over 50% used alcohol in the past year, 13.3% were sexually active, and 12% reported marijuana use. Parent influences were associated with differences in alcohol use, whereas peer influences were associated with differences in all measured health-risk behaviors: tobacco and alcohol use, sexual activity, and marijuana use. Regression analyses demonstrated that peer social influences were the only measures independently associated with abstinence from tobacco (p < .05), alcohol (p < .01), sexual activity (p < .05), and marijuana use (p < .05). In all analyses, peers emerged as the most consistent social influence on health-risk behavior. CONCLUSION: This study suggests peers and peer group behavior may be better predictors of adolescent health-risk behaviors than parental social influences among young adolescents. SN - 1054-139X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11377991/Social_influences_on_health_risk_behaviors_among_minority_middle_school_students_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054139X0100194X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -