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Apolipoprotein B, ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and blood pressure in abdominally obese white and black American women.
J Hum Hypertens 2001; 15(5):299-305JH

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the association of apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL) with blood pressure in abdominally obese white and black American women. We also sought to determine if there are ethnic differences in blood pressure values that could be explained by differences in mean values of ApoB and TC/HDL.

METHODS

Data (n = 1844) from the Third US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used in this study. Abdominal obesity was defined as waist circumference (WC) of > or =88cm or having WC greater than what was expected as predicted from residuals obtained from linear regression of WC on BMI. Bi-variate Pearson's correlation analysis was used to quantify the degree of association of ApoB and TC/HDL with blood pressure and other lipids. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the independent contribution of ApoB and TC/HDL to blood pressure, adjusting for age, total cholesterol, alcohol intake, and smoking. To determine ethnic differences in blood pressure values associated with ApoB or TC/HDL, dummy variables were used to compare blacks with whites fitted in multiple regression models, while adjusting for age, total cholesterol, alcohol intake and smoking.

RESULTS

Elevated ApoB was positively associated with diastolic and systolic blood pressure (DBP/SBP) in blacks and whites, independent of age, total cholesterol, alcohol intake and smoking (P < 0.01). Elevated TC/HDL was also positively associated with increased DBP and SBP in whites (P < 0.05). For the same value of ApoB and TC/HDL whites had higher values of DBP and SBP than blacks, adjusting for confounding variables.

CONCLUSIONS

Compared with TC/HDL, ApoB was more strongly associated with DBP and SBP in both abdominally obese white and black women. Since ApoB is associated with hypertension, the combination of elevated ApoB and hypertension may identify a group of patients with more marked risk of vascular disease, thus, warranting further investigation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Community Medicine, Mercer University School of Medicine 1550 College Street Macon, GA 31207, USA. okosun_i@mercer.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11378831

Citation

Okosun, I S., et al. "Apolipoprotein B, Ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL-C, and Blood Pressure in Abdominally Obese White and Black American Women." Journal of Human Hypertension, vol. 15, no. 5, 2001, pp. 299-305.
Okosun IS, Choi S, Hash R, et al. Apolipoprotein B, ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and blood pressure in abdominally obese white and black American women. J Hum Hypertens. 2001;15(5):299-305.
Okosun, I. S., Choi, S., Hash, R., & Dever, G. E. (2001). Apolipoprotein B, ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and blood pressure in abdominally obese white and black American women. Journal of Human Hypertension, 15(5), pp. 299-305.
Okosun IS, et al. Apolipoprotein B, Ratio of Total Cholesterol to HDL-C, and Blood Pressure in Abdominally Obese White and Black American Women. J Hum Hypertens. 2001;15(5):299-305. PubMed PMID: 11378831.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Apolipoprotein B, ratio of total cholesterol to HDL-C, and blood pressure in abdominally obese white and black American women. AU - Okosun,I S, AU - Choi,S, AU - Hash,R, AU - Dever,G E, PY - 2000/09/15/received PY - 2000/11/16/revised PY - 2000/11/29/accepted PY - 2001/5/30/pubmed PY - 2001/7/28/medline PY - 2001/5/30/entrez SP - 299 EP - 305 JF - Journal of human hypertension JO - J Hum Hypertens VL - 15 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the association of apolipoprotein B (ApoB) and total cholesterol to high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (TC/HDL) with blood pressure in abdominally obese white and black American women. We also sought to determine if there are ethnic differences in blood pressure values that could be explained by differences in mean values of ApoB and TC/HDL. METHODS: Data (n = 1844) from the Third US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used in this study. Abdominal obesity was defined as waist circumference (WC) of > or =88cm or having WC greater than what was expected as predicted from residuals obtained from linear regression of WC on BMI. Bi-variate Pearson's correlation analysis was used to quantify the degree of association of ApoB and TC/HDL with blood pressure and other lipids. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to assess the independent contribution of ApoB and TC/HDL to blood pressure, adjusting for age, total cholesterol, alcohol intake, and smoking. To determine ethnic differences in blood pressure values associated with ApoB or TC/HDL, dummy variables were used to compare blacks with whites fitted in multiple regression models, while adjusting for age, total cholesterol, alcohol intake and smoking. RESULTS: Elevated ApoB was positively associated with diastolic and systolic blood pressure (DBP/SBP) in blacks and whites, independent of age, total cholesterol, alcohol intake and smoking (P < 0.01). Elevated TC/HDL was also positively associated with increased DBP and SBP in whites (P < 0.05). For the same value of ApoB and TC/HDL whites had higher values of DBP and SBP than blacks, adjusting for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS: Compared with TC/HDL, ApoB was more strongly associated with DBP and SBP in both abdominally obese white and black women. Since ApoB is associated with hypertension, the combination of elevated ApoB and hypertension may identify a group of patients with more marked risk of vascular disease, thus, warranting further investigation. SN - 0950-9240 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11378831/Apolipoprotein_B_ratio_of_total_cholesterol_to_HDL_C_and_blood_pressure_in_abdominally_obese_white_and_black_American_women_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sj.jhh.1001181 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -