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Effects on menopausal symptoms and acceptability of isoflavone-containing soy powder dietary supplementation.
Climacteric 2001; 4(1):13-8C

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To assess the acceptability of the delivery of an isoflavone supplementation in the form of a powdered drink, and whether the supplementation of dietary isoflavones in this manner decreased the incidence of menopausal flushes. The secondary aims included assessment of other symptoms or parameters of estrogen deficiency and responses to isoflavones.

METHODS

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial comprising 24 postmenopausal women with symptoms of estrogen deficiency was performed over a 12-week period. The women were randomized to receive a dietary beverage containing isoflavones or an isoflavone-free, isocaloric placebo preparation.

RESULTS

Although there was a high compliance rate among individual patients, there was a 25% withdrawal rate from the study in the active group. The incidence of complaints of bad taste tended to be higher in the active group (p = 0.07), and the total number of adverse events was significantly higher in this group (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of flushes between the groups. There was no difference between the groups in Greene Menopause Symptom Scores, vaginal maturation value, levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) or sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), or bone turnover markers.

CONCLUSIONS

Powdered energy drinks are not commonly consumed in Australia and were poorly tolerated in this study. The high withdrawal rate and reporting of side-effects suggests that other methods of isoflavone delivery may be more appropriate in this culture, in future trials. At the dose used no benefit was seen in relief from menopausal symptoms, although for the sample size, the study could only have been expected to detect major differences between the groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Caroline Chisholm Centre for Women and Children, Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11379373

Citation

Knight, D C., et al. "Effects On Menopausal Symptoms and Acceptability of Isoflavone-containing Soy Powder Dietary Supplementation." Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, vol. 4, no. 1, 2001, pp. 13-8.
Knight DC, Howes JB, Eden JA, et al. Effects on menopausal symptoms and acceptability of isoflavone-containing soy powder dietary supplementation. Climacteric. 2001;4(1):13-8.
Knight, D. C., Howes, J. B., Eden, J. A., & Howes, L. G. (2001). Effects on menopausal symptoms and acceptability of isoflavone-containing soy powder dietary supplementation. Climacteric : the Journal of the International Menopause Society, 4(1), pp. 13-8.
Knight DC, et al. Effects On Menopausal Symptoms and Acceptability of Isoflavone-containing Soy Powder Dietary Supplementation. Climacteric. 2001;4(1):13-8. PubMed PMID: 11379373.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects on menopausal symptoms and acceptability of isoflavone-containing soy powder dietary supplementation. AU - Knight,D C, AU - Howes,J B, AU - Eden,J A, AU - Howes,L G, PY - 2001/5/31/pubmed PY - 2001/7/13/medline PY - 2001/5/31/entrez SP - 13 EP - 8 JF - Climacteric : the journal of the International Menopause Society JO - Climacteric VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To assess the acceptability of the delivery of an isoflavone supplementation in the form of a powdered drink, and whether the supplementation of dietary isoflavones in this manner decreased the incidence of menopausal flushes. The secondary aims included assessment of other symptoms or parameters of estrogen deficiency and responses to isoflavones. METHODS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial comprising 24 postmenopausal women with symptoms of estrogen deficiency was performed over a 12-week period. The women were randomized to receive a dietary beverage containing isoflavones or an isoflavone-free, isocaloric placebo preparation. RESULTS: Although there was a high compliance rate among individual patients, there was a 25% withdrawal rate from the study in the active group. The incidence of complaints of bad taste tended to be higher in the active group (p = 0.07), and the total number of adverse events was significantly higher in this group (p < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the incidence of flushes between the groups. There was no difference between the groups in Greene Menopause Symptom Scores, vaginal maturation value, levels of follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) or sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), or bone turnover markers. CONCLUSIONS: Powdered energy drinks are not commonly consumed in Australia and were poorly tolerated in this study. The high withdrawal rate and reporting of side-effects suggests that other methods of isoflavone delivery may be more appropriate in this culture, in future trials. At the dose used no benefit was seen in relief from menopausal symptoms, although for the sample size, the study could only have been expected to detect major differences between the groups. SN - 1369-7137 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11379373/Effects_on_menopausal_symptoms_and_acceptability_of_isoflavone_containing_soy_powder_dietary_supplementation_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/menopause.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -