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Application of the National Cancer Institute international criteria for determination of microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer.
Cancer Res. 2001 Jun 01; 61(11):4371-4.CR

Abstract

Recently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) established criteria for determination of microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal tumors. Although the best panel of markers for ovarian tumors is not known, we evaluated epithelial ovarian cancers for MSI based on the NCI recommendations. One hundred and nine ovarian tumors were analyzed for MSI by gel analysis of paired germ-line and tumor DNA. PCR amplification was performed using the panel of five microsatellite markers recommended by the NCI (BAT25, BAT26, D5S346, D2S123, and D17S250) and nine additional markers picked based on their genomic location (NME1, D10S197, D11S904, D13S175, DXS981, DXS6800, DXS6807, AR, and D3S1611). Tumors were characterized on the basis of: high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) if two or more of the five NCI markers showed instability or there was instability at 30% or more of all markers tested; or low-frequency MSI (MSI-L) if only one of the five NCI markers showed instability or <30% of all of the markers. All of the other tumors were considered microsatellite stable. On the basis of the NCI markers, 12 (11%) tumors demonstrated MSI-H, and 8 (7%) additional tumors had MSI-L. When all of the 14 markers were considered together, 13 (12%) tumors demonstrated MSI-H (based on 30% or more unstable loci), and 26 (24%) tumors had MSI-L. A single tumor identified to have MSI-H based upon all of the markers tested would have been classified as MSI-L based upon the NCI markers alone. Inclusion of an additional dinucleotide marker (NME1) to the NCI panel allowed detection of all of the tumors with MSI-H using only six markers. MSI-H occurs in approximately 12% of invasive ovarian tumors. For optimal detection of microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer, an additional marker (NME1) may be required, along with the five recommended by the NCI.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Holden Cancer Center, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242-1109, USA. anil-sood@uiowa.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Evaluation Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

11389062

Citation

Sood, A K., et al. "Application of the National Cancer Institute International Criteria for Determination of Microsatellite Instability in Ovarian Cancer." Cancer Research, vol. 61, no. 11, 2001, pp. 4371-4.
Sood AK, Holmes R, Hendrix MJ, et al. Application of the National Cancer Institute international criteria for determination of microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer. Cancer Res. 2001;61(11):4371-4.
Sood, A. K., Holmes, R., Hendrix, M. J., & Buller, R. E. (2001). Application of the National Cancer Institute international criteria for determination of microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer. Cancer Research, 61(11), 4371-4.
Sood AK, et al. Application of the National Cancer Institute International Criteria for Determination of Microsatellite Instability in Ovarian Cancer. Cancer Res. 2001 Jun 1;61(11):4371-4. PubMed PMID: 11389062.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Application of the National Cancer Institute international criteria for determination of microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer. AU - Sood,A K, AU - Holmes,R, AU - Hendrix,M J, AU - Buller,R E, PY - 2001/6/5/pubmed PY - 2001/6/22/medline PY - 2001/6/5/entrez SP - 4371 EP - 4 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res. VL - 61 IS - 11 N2 - Recently, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) established criteria for determination of microsatellite instability (MSI) in colorectal tumors. Although the best panel of markers for ovarian tumors is not known, we evaluated epithelial ovarian cancers for MSI based on the NCI recommendations. One hundred and nine ovarian tumors were analyzed for MSI by gel analysis of paired germ-line and tumor DNA. PCR amplification was performed using the panel of five microsatellite markers recommended by the NCI (BAT25, BAT26, D5S346, D2S123, and D17S250) and nine additional markers picked based on their genomic location (NME1, D10S197, D11S904, D13S175, DXS981, DXS6800, DXS6807, AR, and D3S1611). Tumors were characterized on the basis of: high-frequency MSI (MSI-H) if two or more of the five NCI markers showed instability or there was instability at 30% or more of all markers tested; or low-frequency MSI (MSI-L) if only one of the five NCI markers showed instability or <30% of all of the markers. All of the other tumors were considered microsatellite stable. On the basis of the NCI markers, 12 (11%) tumors demonstrated MSI-H, and 8 (7%) additional tumors had MSI-L. When all of the 14 markers were considered together, 13 (12%) tumors demonstrated MSI-H (based on 30% or more unstable loci), and 26 (24%) tumors had MSI-L. A single tumor identified to have MSI-H based upon all of the markers tested would have been classified as MSI-L based upon the NCI markers alone. Inclusion of an additional dinucleotide marker (NME1) to the NCI panel allowed detection of all of the tumors with MSI-H using only six markers. MSI-H occurs in approximately 12% of invasive ovarian tumors. For optimal detection of microsatellite instability in ovarian cancer, an additional marker (NME1) may be required, along with the five recommended by the NCI. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/11389062/Application_of_the_National_Cancer_Institute_international_criteria_for_determination_of_microsatellite_instability_in_ovarian_cancer_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=11389062 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -